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Question about cooking eggs
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Protege385 posted:
Not sure if this is where to post this, but I have a question about this. I was sick a few days ago and had syptoms of food poisoning. I eat ten egg whites a day and recently began buying bulk eggs.

I always hardboil eggs. I noticed that the egg whites of this current batch of bulk eggs are always really soft and have a slightly different texture than normal. I ate eggs for the first time since I got sick and felt a little queesy afterwards. I tested a few uncooked and they are not bad. Could there be a bacterial problem or anything that could cause sickness from eating cooked eggs?
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Elaine Magee, MPH, RD responded:
Generally whatever bacteria might be in raw eggs is eliminated when eggs are cooked. When liquid egg products are pasteurized, this also eliminates the risk of bacteria.

Are you sure it was food poisoning and not the flu? Maybe you felt queazy because your system is still recovering?

Let me find you a good link to describing different types of bacteria and food poisoning symptoms so you can see if this describes what you experienced. I'll post it as a reply here, okay?
 
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erice_ma replied to Elaine Magee, MPH, RD's response:
> Let me find you a good link to describing different types of bacteria

FDA's Bad Bug Book is my favorite.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/FoodborneIllness/FoodborneIllnessFoodbornePathogensNaturalToxins/BadBugBook/default.htm

> Could there be a bacterial problem or anything that could cause sickness from eating cooked eggs?

The most common bacteria affecting eggs is Salmonella which is destroyed by cooking. But there are some bacteria which are not destroyed by cooking and others where if the food is temperature abused (held at room temp for a long time while bacteria are alive) can lead to enterotoxins not destroyed by cooking. So, it isn't impossible to have gotten food poisoning from cooked eggs. But it isn't very likely either.
 
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Elaine Magee, MPH, RD replied to erice_ma's response:
Thanks for that great link EricE

I couldn't find the resource that I had in mind but I think this one might also be helpful.

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001652.htm

Most food poisoning strikes within 2 to 6 hours after consuming the various food poisoning bacteria. If you click on the various bacteria listed there, you'll find some specific symptoms for each and you might have a better idea as to which bacteria (and potential food) was causing the illness.


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