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Should I have a baby and get my tubes tied?
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LoganNHaleighsMom posted:
Let me give some background information to help. I am a 21 year old mother of a 2 1/2 year old and 1 year old. Both of my children were born via c-section, the first due to preeclampsia. Since my daughter was born last July I have been having a lot of gyno related issues, in December I had a miscarriage at 12 weeks pregnant, a few months later I started having severe abdominal pain, I went to the hospital several times and the last time they noticed I had a cyst rupture and I was bleeding internally. I figured that was what the pain was from, however the pain did not stop... I went to the ObGyn and they did a lapriscopy and discovered I had Endometriosis, that was 2 months ago. They removed the Endometriosis and said I should not have any further issues. I have been running a fever for 4 months straight EVERY DAY, it ranges from 99.5 to 101, Some days my abdomin is very swollen and hard and I have not had a period. I am having alot of pain, swelling, dizziness, and painful intercourse. My husband and I want to have one more child and we have had people tell us it would be better to have another child now so I can either have my tubes tied or a hysterectomy? Again I am 21 years old and do not know what to do my Doctor is not much help!!! PLEASE ANY ADVICE OR KNOWLEDGE IS APPRECIATED!! I STILL HAVE NO IDEA WHAT IS HAPPENING TO MY BODY :(
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Byroney_WebMD_Staff responded:
Dear LoganNHaleighsMom,

I am sorry to hear about your endometriosis and other challenges. I would strongly suggest you get a second opinion from another doctor. Running a fever for four months is not typical, and I am sure you'd like to know what's causing it--along with your swollen abdomen, dizziness, and other symptoms.

Hope you feel better soon,

Byroney
 
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An_195248 responded:
I'm very concerned that you've been running a fever for 4 months. Your other symptoms are also a concern. I urge you to see a doctor to determine the cause.

Before having any surgery or procedure on your female organs, please educate yourself about the consequences. The uterus and ovaries are meant to work together and any procedure to alter their function can have far-reaching adverse effects.

The HERS Foundation at www.hersfoundation.com provides educational resources for hysterectomy and other female organ procedures.

Tubal ligation oftentimes results in periods that are more problematic - heavier bleeding, cramping, etc. - due to the hormonal disruption caused by the loss of blood flow from the ovaries. It can also cause other hormone imbalance/deficiency symptoms similar to those of menopause but worse. These can not only make your life miserable but also predispose you to "age" related maladies or diseases. There's actually a name for it - Tubal Ligation Syndrome.

Hysterectomy is permanently damaging - physically, emotionally, mentally and sexually. Here's some info:

The uterus is key to the pelvic structure. Its removal will cause the bladder and bowel to prolapse and increase risk of incontinence. The severing of the ligaments that hold the uterus in place will cause your spine to compress resulting in a protruding abdomen / thickened waist and possible back, hip and leg problems.

Your risk of heart disease will be 3x that of an intact woman (7x if the ovaries are also removed - castration).

The severed nerves and blood vessels will reduce sensation in your pelvic area, genitalia, vagina, breasts and possibly throughout your body. You will likely experience loss of libido and sexual response. You will no longer experience uterine orgasms. Some women also experience a loss of loving and maternal feelings (which may be due to the connection between the uterus and oxytocin).

In 35-40% of cases, the ovaries fail prematurely after the uterus is removed. The ovaries are part of the endocrine system and produce hormones throughout life; they do not shut down at menopause.

The HERS Foundation at www.hersfoundation.com/ provides women with the facts about and alternatives to hysterectomy. View the Female Anatomy DVD. Check out the Facts, Adverse Effects Data and the Blog to find out more. HERS is available for consultation at (888) 750-HERS. 98% of women HERS has referred to board-certified gynecologists after being told they needed hysterectomies, discovered that, in fact, they did not need hysterectomies.
 
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georgiagail responded:
You need to set this goal of having yet another child aside and get this unknown fever, pain, swelling and painful intercourse looked into first before considering another child, a tubal ligation or a hysterectomy.

If your physician is not adequately addressing these symptoms, find another physician.

Gail


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