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    My Clitoris "Seems to be Disappearing"
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    heyell posted:
    I am a 54 year old female (mother of three) who ended an "on and off" 22 year relationship with my youngest son's father. This occurred 2 1/2 years ago and I have not been sexually active since then. I am in a relationship and want to be intimate with him. I was "checking" my body and my clitoris was not prominent/accessible as previously.Is this normal or a result of aging? I am concerned about my ability to become aroused since the clitoris is the "stimulus/arousal" center.PLEASE ADVISE/HELP.
    Reply
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    georgiagail responded:
    Do you masturbate? If so, do you become aroused doing this?

    The actual clitoral tissue goes far deeper into the pelvic area than most of us realize; we only see the "tip" of this (the clitoris).

    Gail
     
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    heyell replied to georgiagail's response:
    I have a medical background and I am very knowledgeable about the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Thanks for responding.
     
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    georgiagail replied to heyell's response:
    Well good for you. Then you should know that the common sense approach to this is to try stimulating it and see what happens.

    I'm 58 years old and the thought of even attempting to see my clitoris would likely leave me bound up with muscle pain for a week. However the "touch evaluation" shows that things are working just fine down there.

    Gail
     
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    An_195685 replied to heyell's response:
    if you're so knowledgeable then why did you ask?
     
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    heyell replied to An_195685's response:
    Hi. Nobody in the medical community has every answer for every medical, physiological, and/or anatomical problem!! I did NOT state that I know EVERYTHING! Obviously, I don't know about this "condition" which is the reason I inquired. I am not one of those people who is a know-it-all. Also, I wanted to know if other women have this "condition." Thank you for taking the extra time to respond twice.
     
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    georgiagail replied to heyell's response:
    A good article on the anatomy of the clitoris pointing out (because of the large number of nerves in this area) size doesn't really matter. Interestingly enough, in menopause the labia can decrease in size sometimes making the clitoris appear larger.

    http://www.enotalone.com/article/6611.html

    Gail
     
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    forcefieldoflove replied to heyell's response:
    Hey Heyell,

    I saw on the Dr. Oz show a couple days ago that the clitoris does atrophy as we age. The whole show was on gynecology, so go to the Dr Oz website and see if you can find that recent show.
    He advises ALL of us women to take a look at ourselves down there. The color of the vagina inside indicates what stage in life we are in. Before the age of 40, the vagina is dark pink, but becomes lighter in color as we age. If it has no pink anymore, menapause has taken over, and where before you could insert a pin in the walls and not feel it, now you can actually tear a hole in it. He advises us to get estrogen suppositories and if you also have NO sex drive, you need to have the testosterone levels checked. If they are bottomed out, then they need to be replaced, so get to a Doctor. Once the sex drive returns, keep it at a very low dose. The MD's only have abt 4 hrs training on hormones, so seek out a specialist who treats menapause. As a matter of fact, when our bodies stop producing hormones, a signal is sent to the brain to begin killing us off, and that is what starts the whole disease process! Why Doctors don't first check hormone levels for depression and a whole range of symptoms shows their lack of knowledge, but then if we get sick, they make money!!! As for me, I am turning to Bio-identical Hormones like Suzan Somers does. My appt is next week and I cannot wait. Sorry if I came off as a know-it-all, I am just the messenger LOL!
     
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    forcefieldoflove responded:
    I tried to reply but the website said it was unavailable and erased the whole answer I had for you!
    Go to the website of Doctor Oz show, as yesterday he talked about clitoril atrophy and how Docs don't know about it.
     
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    dalily replied to forcefieldoflove's response:
    Hw did the bi identicals work out for you ?
     
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    gigi967 replied to dalily's response:
    My GYN told me it was because of my weight and that was the end of discussion other than he ordered a massive amount of blood for hormone check. I'm 48 and started noticing menopause symptoms last year. Why would he say it's atrophying because of my weight??? I'm overweight for sure but haven't hit anywhere near 250 lbs. but I still don't agree weight is the issue here. Any comments will be most helpful!!!
     
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    georgiagail replied to gigi967's response:
    It's unlikely he's saying it's shrinking because of your weight but rather harder to see/find because of the extra weight in that area.

    It's a bit like men who worry that their penis is growing shorter as they age when what is happening is that their panus (the adipose tissue around their abdomen) is expanding with their weight gain making it seem like the penis is shortening.

    I hope this makes sense.

    Gail
     
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    gigi967 replied to georgiagail's response:
    Thanks for replying Gail. So is it a real thing then??? Is menopause the reason it is so much smaller in just the amount of a years time? I miss my orgasams! Lol. At first I was blaming it on my medicine I had been taking but now that my husband mentioned to me that it was so much smaller than originally, I'm wondering if lack of orgasams is because I'm not getting the stimulation on the clitoris anymore. Plus my whole deal of lack of sex drive may be partially to blame. I just feel badly (and guilty) for my husband because he wants very badly to please me too but most of the time can't. I FEEL the sensation but just can't quite get there, and it's frustrating! Any thoughts?
     
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    georgiagail replied to gigi967's response:
    I have found it sometimes harder more recently with menopause (I am now in my 60's) to reach the "end goal" so to speak.

    I did speak to my OB-GYN about hormone replacement therapy and that medication lasted all of one week since while I was there he suggested a mammogram which ended up catching breast cancer; luckily stage one (a tumor so small neither one of us could feel it during breast examinations).

    So while HRT is now off the board this suggestion by my OB-GYN saved my life by catching breast cancer in a very early stage.

    Gail
     
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    bigred53 replied to georgiagail's response:
    Gigi, lack of orgasms or difficulties achieving orgasms can be caused by many different medications. Do some research on the ones you take.

    I have the opposite of your problem. I'm very easily aroused and my clitoris seems larger. Life sure is interesting.

    Michelle


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