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Jane - HELP! Recurrent (possible) PID
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jk5493 posted:
I had an infection that started later february/early march. It was detected after I had been getting a fever every other 3 or 4 days... then, one night it just didn't go away. So, the health center did some tests. Urine culture came back for any and all STIs, blood tests were all within normal range. Pelvic exam was painful, revealed excess discharge with an odor and abnormal color, and provoked bleeding. After a week, I was put on 3 antibiotics. I took 4 or 5 doses of azithromycin at once, then 4 or 5 doses of metrodiazole (spelling?) at once, and then was put on 10 days of doxycycline. After a week of antibiotics, the discharge reduced to a clear odorless discharge for about a week - then, the amount picked back up. Cramping was still bad and persisted throughout these past few weeks. Noticed a fever Wednesday night or Thursday morning of this week that has not gone away. Started out just really tired, then, gradually noticed a high amount of discharge with an odor that is slightly yellow. I have lower back pain and cramps that radiate into my thighs. I am not sexually active. Last date of sex was in 2009 (it was unprotected). Last true period was Feb. 2011 (provera used in January provoked 3 days of spotting). Never a history of any STIs. Is this PID?

The health center on campus doesn't know what to do anymore. I am away at school with no transportation as of now. I have an appt with an OBGYN back home on May 16th. What should I do? Go to the emergency room? (not sure if Medicaid would cover that...) Get more antibiotics from the health center? (They made me VERY sick last time)... is the hospital my best bet? If so, can it wait? Temp was approx. 100.4 this morning and is currently sitting at 99.7.

Any help is great.
Thanks,

Jade
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Jane Harrison Hohner, RN, RNP responded:
Dear Jade: Dang, all your STD screens were neg, and your last intercourse was with a condom three years ago. You were definitely given the full course of antibiotics to cover both anerobic and aerobic organisms. Your while blood count was apparently within normal limits.

I know of only one case in almost 30 years of my clinical practice where a woman showed up with a tubo-ovarian abscess from an apparently very old and non-symptomatic PID. The abscess was visible on ultrasound and her whilte blood count was elevated. She was sick enough to need a brief hospitalization for IV antibiotics. Her white blood count then normalized.

So while I have not ruled out a continued PID, the pieces don't completely fit. I would ask myself "Are there any other possible etiologies for the pelvic cramping such as an ovarian cyst? Are there other causes for a low grade fever such as an appendicitis or bowel infection? Vaginal dischage is not the most exact diagnostic tool; could it be caused by changes in the vaginal flora from all those antibiotics?"

Given that the Health Service is your primary care place, I would urge you to follow up with them. They are in the best position to decide if an ER visit is needed. As you have heard me say many times, unless you see an actual GYN in the ER, the ER may not be the best place to get a non-acute GYN care. You can ask the Health Service what some other causes of the fever and fatigue might be.

In Concern,
Jane

PS Thank you for the screen photo; it helps me remember people's backstories better.
J


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