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Bleeding starts everytime I have Sex
chivivor posted:
everytime my boyfriend and I have (sexual) relations I start bleeding I'm 48 and this is just starting. What is wrong with me now??????!!!
Remebering my first birth.
Anon_5366 responded:
It could be several things, see your GYN.
Jane Harrison Hohner, RN, RNP responded:
Dear chivivor: An is correct. Here is some additional background information to help guide your questions to your GYN.

There are two basic culprits that can cause bleeding after sex: problems with the cervix and things that create bleeding from the uterine lining. Bleeding coming from the cervix could come from a cervical lesion---if one has had a recent normal PAP smear this is unlikely. An infection of the cervix (eg from Chlamydia) can make the cervix more "friable" (easier to bleed). In some women there is a normal enlargement of the area of glandular type tissue. These women can have bleeding when the cervix is sampled for a PAP smear. A polyp coming from the cervical canal may bleed only when the cervix is touched. Endocervical polyps of this type may be readily seen during a speculum exam.

If the uterine lining is easily destabilized, having sex can prompt spotting or breakthrough bleeding. Some women will have this type of spotting if sex occurs during ovulation or right before menstrual flow is slated to begin. Women using hormonal forms of birth control may also have a less stable lining.. Endometrial polyps or uterine fibroids can create a focus for unstable uterine lining.

If a woman has a history of missed periods, her uterine lining may be very thickened. In that situation spotting can represent small amounts of the lining being shed---just off the top layer. This situation can also occur during the four to five year transition into menopause

Given the multiple causes of bleeding after sex, one should go see a GYN if the spotting persists or is recurrent.


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