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abnormal bleeding for 15 days
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An_250324 posted:
I have been bleeding for 15 days now when it started it was a dark brown goo and on the 12th day it turned bright red and is really heavy could something be wrong with me
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Jane Harrison Hohner, RN, RNP responded:
Dear An: You did not mention if you are using some type of hormonal birth control--or not. I'll try and answer for both scenarios.

Hormonal birth control---One should always rule out an undetected pregnancy first.Once this has been eliminated as a cause then the most likely explanation is erratic bleeding due to the effects of the hormones in the method of birth control.

As you may have read, breakthrough bleeding (BTB) can be a common side effect of most types of hormonal birth control (eg pills/patch/ring/shot/Mirena IUD). Among birth control pill users BTB frequently occurs after a missed or late pill. More remotely, BTB in a pill user can arise if she has gotten a chlamydia infection. Yet, if you both are monogamous this is not going to apply.

When a woman uses hormonal birth control it can make the lining of the uterus more unstable--so it is easier to have some of it begin to shed. Sometimes the lining is less stable because the hormones make the lining much thinner (actually this is good as a thin lining is a healthy lining). Sometimes the lining is unstable because the hormones can make parts of the lining out of synch.

Whilst BTB on hormonal methods of birth control is a nuisance side effect, the protection from pregnancy is still in effect. If your poor cycle control persists you should return to your GYN or clinic. Often a change in the brand, or formula, of birth control pill will fix the problem.

No use of hormonal birth control---Once pregnancy is ruled out, the most common reason for a menstrual pattern like you have described is not having an ovulation every month. In a normal cycle, estrogen is produced all month. Estrogen is responsible for building up the lining of your uterus so you have something to shed each month.

In a normal cycle, progesterone production increases following ovulation and release of an egg.. Progesterone "stabilizes" the uterine lining in preparation for a possible implantation of a new pregnancy. If you are not pregnant that month the levels of estrogen and progesterone fall, triggering the release of the uterine lining—your period.

So, if you do not ovulate, the estrogen build up of the lining continues, but without the usual ovulation associated progesterone. Thus, the hormone levels don't decline, and the lining stays up inside the uterus—often as a missed/late period. Alternatively, the built up lining can begin to shed on its own creating erratic bleeding patterns which are usually "too-light" or super heavy and prolonged.

Causes for not ovulating are multifold: thyroid problems, pituitary problems, ovarian cysts, physical stressors (eg sudden increases in exercise, crash dieting), emotional stressors (problems with boyfriends/girlfriends, finances), increased body weight, anorexia, rotating shifts at work, etc. If one is aged 45 or older, missed ovulations can be due to perimenopause.

Bottom line, very heavy bleeding which lasts more than seven days should be evaluated by a GYN or even your local county family planning clinic. They can give you the most "for sure" answer.

Yours,
Jane


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