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Chronic Constipation
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An_193239 posted:
I have had bad constipation my whole life. I grew up thinking that 2 poops a week was normal. My parents recall having to give me an enema at least once a month as a baby. Also, I once tried anal intercourse and .01 second into it I felt like I was going to die because the pain was so awful.
At my last yearly checkup, my OBGYN noted that I have an "extremely tiny little uterus." Is it possible that an abnormally small rectum/anus is the cause of this constipation?
Is it fixable?
If so, what steps should I take?
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georgiagail responded:
No; the fact that your OBGYN says you have a tiny uterus doesn't not mean you have an abnormally small rectum/anus (and this would play no role in constipation).

For many, two bowel movements a week is perfectly normal. Constipation occurs when having a bowel movement becomes difficult and has nothing to do with how frequently one has one. Neither has it anything to do with how painful an attempt at anal sex was. The assumption that one must have at least one bowel movement a day is inaccurate. How often one goes is dependent on how much fiber and fluid they consume, how physically active one is and can be affected by medications such as pain meds (even over the counter ones)

If you can pass stool easily, you are not constipated. If you find it hard to pass stool, purchase a box of Fiber One cereal, begin by taking 1/2 cup of this daily and slowly work up to a cup. You will notice more frequently trips to the bathroom within a few days of using this product.

Gail
 
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Jayb9763 responded:
There are a lot of difference of opinions when it comes to bowel movements but I would like to add that I have a cousin with the same problem. After years of only making one or two trips to the restroom, a week, she became impacted and had to be cleaned out. Her doctor told her that a normal person should be eliminating at least two to three times a day if your digestive track is working properly. Thats every 3 to 4 hrs. The idea is that you should be eliminating what you digested 6 hours ago. That would make it within two hours of a meal if your eating at 8, 12, and 6. Some doctors would say otherwise but if your bowels are slow to move, you may be harboring a lot of toxins in your body that are not at all good for you. Certainly, every one is different based on their diet but if your not having enough bowel movements then a person should look into changing their diet, if for nothing more then to be healthy. Losts of fiber, protien and complex carbs obtained from leafy greans, can help with regulation.

Hope you still check this site.

Happy trails.
 
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georgiagail replied to Jayb9763's response:
Your cousins physician was quite inaccurate in he/she told her. People with bowel diseases such as Crohn's may have several bowel movements a day but that is because they suffer from a bowel disease, not because this is normal.

Misinformation such as this is why some folks become hooked on laxative products.

Gail
 
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tlkittycat1968 replied to Jayb9763's response:
By that reasoning then I'm constipated despite the fact that I have no problems "going" and no pain. I only have one bowel movement a day and will occasionally skip a day but for me, once a day seems to be my normal.

When my son was younger, my mom was worried that he wasn't having a bowel movement every day but when I talked to his pediatrician, he said not every infant does.


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