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heart size at upper limits of normal
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37027 posted:
I was just informed that my heart was at the upper limits of normal. What does this mean? Am I in danger of a heart attack? Is there some life change I can make to help my condition. Should I even worry about it?
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"Just informed that my heart was at the upper limits of normal."

Heart size has a normal limit range, and good to know, if/when it exceeds that, the heart is then considered as being enlarged, medically termed cardiomegaly.

An enlarged heart (which sometimes may/can also be considered borderline) is a very general term and refers to a number of different things.

The heart can become enlarged all over, known as global enlargement, or just a chamber can be enlarged, known as regional.

Worth mentioning, there is a medical term known as the cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), which is a measurement on a chest X-ray (CXR) of the width of the heart divided by the width of the chest.

Typically, a CTR greater than 50% is suggestive of an enlarged or dilated heart. Noteworthy though, in some cases, a heart may/can be greater than 50% of the cardiothoracic ratio and still be considered a normal heart.

One of the most versatile diagnostic imaging modalities to determine heart size is a non-invasive echocardiogram (cardiac ultrasound), with non-invasive Cardiac MR (a "heart-specific" magnetic resonance technology) reported as being more accurate.

As applicable, if the particular problem (that caused the enlargement in the first place) is caught in time, is treated accordingly, and conditions such as a major heart attack have not previously occurred, the heart may/can return to somewhat normal, near-normal or even completely normal in appearance and function.

"Am I in danger of a heart attack?"


Not necessarily.

"Is there some life change I can make to help my condition."

Yes, keeping all known modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular closely in-check/under control.

ALWAYS be proactive in your health care and treatment. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctor(s).

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD community member (since 8/99)

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Be well-informed

As Applicable

HeartInfo

Cardiac Enlargement: A Patient Guide

What is cardiac enlargement?

There are two types of cardiac enlargement: hypertrophy and dilation....../Hypertrophy involves an increase in the thickness of the heart muscle. Dilation involves an increase in the size of the inside cavity of a chamber of the heart.

What health problems are associated with cardiac enlargement?

With the exception of exercise-induced enlargement, all forms of cardiac enlargement are abnormal and associated with further problems, including......

http://www.heartinfo.org/ms/guides/4/main.html

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LEARN ABOUT the HEART

WebMD

Human Heart - Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems


http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

WebMD Health/The Cleveland Clinic


How the Healthy Heart Works


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/healthy-heart-works

Your-Doctor

How the Heart Pumps

Animated Tutorial

http://your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/heartpump-tutorial.html

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Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

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It's your future......be there.


. .

WebMD/WebMD message boards does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
 
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37027 responded:
Thank you SO MUCH. I had a heart echo a couple of years ago for fluid around the heart. That report came back as normal. These results are from Vanderbilt Hospital. I particularly appreciate your help on avoiding future problems. I am in your debt.
 
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Marycastillo responded:
so what does it mean when you are told that your heart is within the limits of normal in size? I would like to hear from you if possible. Thank You Mary Castillo
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to Marycastillo's response:
Hi:

"Your heart is within the limits of normal in size"

As previously posted, heart size has a normal limit range, and if/when it exceeds that, the heart would then be considered as being enlarged, medically termed cardiomegaly.

Also, as previously posted, if/when the heart is noted as being borderline, that would specifically be worrisome.

Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctor(s) at ALL times,

Take care,

CardioStar*

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-


Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there.


. .

WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
 
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James Beckerman, MD, FACC responded:
I would generally interpret upper limits of normal as normal, not requiring any intervention, and assuming that the rest of the study was unremarkable, or follow-up. But important to confirm with your doctor that ordered the test.


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