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Leaky Veins
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impatientseeker posted:
I have been diagnosed visually by my GP with Leaky Veins. Is there any other treatment available besides compression hose and calf massage. If this is not the correct forum where should I be?
Reply
 
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi:

As reported, other treatments include, as applicable, walking to increase blood flow, keeping the legs elevated as much as possible, maintaining a normal weight, endovenous laser treatment, and
at the very extreme, vein stripping/removal.

ALWAYS be proactve in your health care and treatment. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctors.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD community member (since 8/99)


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Leaky veins

Leaking veins (venous insufficiency) in the legs refers to the state of the valves in the veins, which keeps blood from rushing down to the feet when standing up. Damage to these fragile valves can result in blood traveling backwards and pooling in the legs, causing swelling and varicose veins.

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Veins work to return blood from the legs to the heart. In order to work against gravity, they contain one way-only valves to help with the "uphill" movement to the heart. When the valves are leaky or "incompetent" the superficial veins can become varicose.

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It's your future......be there. :-)

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WebMD/WebMD message boards does not provide medical advice.

WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service, or treatment.
 
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impatientseeker replied to CardiostarUSA1's response:
Thank you for your reply. I am just searching for alternatives that I may not had read and that my physician is unaware. I know this condition just makes your calves feel heavy and me feel lethargic.
 
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DeadManWalking56 responded:
A diet appropriate for severe heart disease may help.

All the risk factors that contribute to heart disease reduce the number, and weaken and disrupt the function of the body's stem cells that keep our arteries and veins healthy. They are called endothelial progenitor cells. By eating a heart unfriendly diet, people are literally asking for trouble.

DMW


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