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Varicose veins and heart disease
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cooker6920 posted:
I'm male 49 and have varicose veins in my upper and lower legs. I've heard that this could lead to heart disease quickly. Both parents had these veins and my Dad had his surgically stripped. He also died from heart disease. I believe the two are related and I want to take care of the varicose veins very soon. My symptoms are: bulging veins in my thighs and calves, very tired legs after short periods of time on my feet and after walking some distances due to workload, cramps in my legs and feet at night and upon waking in the morning, My job demands that I stand and walk for the entire 8 hour shift. I thought that exercise and walking would help with circulation and strength, but the symptoms are getting worse every week. I know about wearing support hose, but I'm wondering about laser procedures and how effective they are. I realize this is a heart disease community, but I didn't see anything close to my problem in other discussions. Please help. Thanks.
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi:

'But I'm wondering about laser procedures and how effective they are".


General info -

WebMD

Laser treatment for varicose veins

SEE:

How Well It Works


http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/laser-treatment-for-varicose-veins

Additionally here, it has been known for some time that atherosclerosis begins (the process and progression of) at a very early age, even as early as in the pre-teen/teenage years.

Studies performed in the past have shown fatty streaks (represents the earliest precursor to plaque development and plaque is the pathological hallmark of atherosclerosis) as the beginning of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. Soft plaque (more dangerous and unpredictable than hard or calcified plaque) is the early stage of atherosclerosis.

ALWAYS be proactive in your health care and treatment. Keep ALL known modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease closely in-check. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctor(s).

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)




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Be well-informed

WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men and Women

Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

Heart disease SYMPTOMS


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

Mayo Clinic

Heart Disease

Definition. Symptoms. Causes. Risk factors. Complications. Tests and diagnosis. Prevention......

Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, and in some cases, your blood vessels. The various diseases that fall under the umbrella of......

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

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LEARN ABOUT the Heart

WebMD

The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

WebMD Health/The Cleveland Clinic

How the Healthy Heart Works

Arteries, Chambers, Valves

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/healthy-heart-works

Your-Doctor

How the Heart Pumps

Animated Tutorial

http://your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/heartpump-tutorial.html



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Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel, or emerging) for atherosclerosis, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation), diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes secondhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity") high blood pressure (hypertension), high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

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Quote!

Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there. :)

. .

WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service, or treatment.


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