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tiredparentof2 posted:
I am 42 an was in the hospital with chest pains. I had an angigram done and they found out I have an extra artery running from the bottom of my right side to the top of my left. Does anyone know more about this? Is there a name for it? thanks
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi:

According to various medical literature, this is referred to as a coronary anomaly, with examples, as aplicable, being dual (or extra) left anterior descending (LAD) or dual (or extra) right coronary artery.

Sometimes, these types of anatomic coronary variants have a benign course, other times not, i,e., problematic requring intervention.

ALWAYS
be proactive in your health care and treatment. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctors.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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Be well-informed

Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

Coronary artery anatomy

Starting with the left anterior descending (LAD), the most critical, next to the ultra-critical left main (LM).

http://www.heartsite.com/html/lad.html


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WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men and Women

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

Heart Disease SYMPTOMS


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

Mayo Clinic

Heart Disease

Definition. Symptoms. Causes. Risk factors. Complications. Tests and diagnosis. Treatments and drugs. Prevention......

Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, and in some cases, your blood vessels.....

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

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Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel, or emerging) for atherosclerosis, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation), diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes secondhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity") high blood pressure (hypertension), high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).


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Quote!


"Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

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It's your future......be there. :-)

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WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.


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