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    Can hypertension medication cause a heart murmur?
    avatar
    StanHarkleroad posted:
    I have been on Atenolol 50mg daily for several years with no side effects. In the first quarter of 2010 my doctor prescribed Lisinopril 10mg daily to cut my BP a few more points. It has been effective but during a check up 2 weeks ago my doctor found a heart murmur. I had an echocardiogram done and have slight enlargement and regurgitation on the left side. I was told it is not serious at this time and to have it re-checked in 1-2 years. Is it possible that Lisinopril could have caused this? I have had my heart checked numerous times over the past 7-8 years and been to many doctors for different problems and no one ever heard this murmur until now, including my own regular physician. Even in the first quarter of the year when she put me on Lisinopril there was no murmur, or at least not a noticeable one. The only other thing that has changed this year is that I bought a HTC Hero smart phone in March and carried it in my breast pocket, which I had never done with a phone until this year. I do have a family history of heart disease but for this to show up so suddenly seems almost too coincidental. My doctor assured me Lisinopril didn't cause the murmur but it can't be impossible, can it?
     
    avatar
    CardiostarUSA1 responded:
    Hi:

    "Is it possible that lisinopril could have caused this?"


    Seems highly unlikely.

    "I had an echocardiogram done and have slight enlargement and regurgitation on the left side."


    "I have had my heart checked numerous times over the past 7-8 years and been to many doctors for different problems and no one ever heard this murmur until now, including my own regular physician."

    A heart murmur (turbulent sound) may/can come and go throughout life. Sometimes, the presence of a heart murmur does not indicate a disease or problem, and all heart problems do not cause heart murmurs.

    A diastolic (diastole) murmur occurs when the heart relaxes between beats, and a systolic (systole) murmur occurs when the heart contracts (pumps).

    Systolic murmurs are graded by intensity (loudness) from 1 to 6 (I-VI). A grade 1/6 (I/VI) is very faint, heard only with a special effort. A grade 6/6 (VI/VI) is extremely loud and can be heard with a non-amplified stethoscope held slightly away from the chest.

    Priority-selected info is provided below.

    Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctors at ALL times.

    Best of luck down the road of life.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)




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    Be well-informed

    WebMD

    Heart Murmurs

    Heart Murmur Causes


    Most heart murmurs are innocent: They are caused by blood flowing through healthy valves in a healthy heart and do not require treatment.

    However, heart murmurs can be caused by blood flowing through a damaged or overworked heart valve. Heart valve defects may be present at birth or heart valve disease may result from other illnesses, such as......

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-murmur-causes-treatments

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    WebMD

    Heart Disease TYPES

    Men and Women

    Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

    Heart disease SYMPTOMS

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

    Mayo Clinic

    Heart Disease

    Definition. Symptoms. Causes. Risk factors. Complications. Tests and diagnosis. Prevention......

    Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, and in some cases, your blood vessels. The various diseases that fall under the umbrella of......

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

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    HeartSite

    Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images

    http://www.heartsite.com

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    LEARN ABOUT the Heart

    WebMD

    The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

    http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

    WebMD Health/The Cleveland Clinic

    How the Healthy Heart Works

    Arteries, Chambers, Valves

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/healthy-heart-works

    Your-Doctor

    How the Heart Pumps

    Animated Tutorial

    http://your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/heartpump-tutorial.html

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    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .


    It's your future......be there. :-)

    . .

    WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.
     
    avatar
    StanHarkleroad responded:
    Is it possible that a cell phone could emit enough radiation to cause problems? I started carrying my smart phone in my front pocket in March of this year and stopped a couple months ago when I thought I felt a very mild, almost electrical buzzing in my chest near where the phone was. Now I carry it at my side.

    My echo did not list my murmur as a grade so would that mean it's not bad enough to list that way?
     
    avatar
    CardiostarUSA1 replied to StanHarkleroad's response:
    Anything medical is seemingly possible (though sometimes improbable) today.

    Take good care,

    C*




    -

    -


    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .


    It's your future......be there. :-)

    . .

    WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.


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