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    Low Pulse Rate (45-50) After Waking Up from Sleep in the Morning
    avatar
    Rakesh2011 posted:
    Hello,

    Following are the details that might be helpful to you. I just wanted to know why my pulse rate is low (around 45-50 beats per minute) in the morning immediately after I get up from sleep?

    Gender: Male
    Age: 48
    Weight: 82 Kgs
    Height: 5'10"
    Blood Pressure (in the morning after waking up): 120/75

    Hope this information above may prove useful in diagnosing the problem.

    Take the Poll

    Is your pulse rate lower (around 45-50) beats, after waking up from sleep in the morning?
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    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    In general-only here, heart/pulse rate (as well as blood pressure) is lowest at night during sleep, then rises upon waking, peaks in the late afternoon or evening, and then drops off gradually.

    Normal resting range heart rate (HR) is 60-100 beats per minute (BPM). Average resting HR in males is 72-78 BPM and in females is 78-84 BPM. Under 60 BPM is bradycardia (slow heartbeat).

    Bradycardia is ok, that is, unless it causes concerning symptoms, such as lightheadedness or dizziness, weakness, confusion or syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, which includes passing out and fainting).

    Medical rule of thumb, report ANY bothersome, concerning, troublesome, worrisome, worsening, or new symptom(s) to a/your doctor promptly.

    ALWAYS
    be proactive in your health care and treatment. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctor(s).

    Best of luck down the road of life.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



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    Be well-informed

    Learn about the heart's delicate and precise electrical conduction system

    Your-doctor

    Animated Tutorial

    http://www.your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/conductiontutorial.html

    Heart Rhythm Society

    Patient and Public Information Center

    Slow Heartbeat

    http://www.hrspatients.org/patients/signs_symptoms/too_slow.asp

    Cigna / Healthwise

    Bradycardia

    http://www.cigna.com/healthinfo/aa107571.html

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    WebMD

    Heart Disease TYPES

    Men and Women

    Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

    Heart Disease SYMPTOMS

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

    Mayo Clinic

    Heart Disease

    Definition. Symptoms. Causes. Risk factors. Complications. Tests and diagnosis. Treatments and drugs. Prevention......

    Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, and in some cases, your blood vessels. The various diseases that fall under the umbrella of......

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

    HeartSite

    Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

    http://www.heartsite.com

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    LEARN ABOUT the Heart

    WebMD

    The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

    http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

    WebMD/The Cleveland Clinic

    How the Healthy Heart Works

    Arteries, Chambers, Valves

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/healthy-heart-works

    Your-Doctor

    How the Heart Pumps

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    http://your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/heartpump-tutorial.html

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    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

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    t's your future......be there.

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    WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.


    NEVER delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on WebMD.

    If you have a medical emergency, call 911.
     
    avatar
    An_193026 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
    Maybe I'm wierd, but I notice a drop in my pulse/bp while I'm working out- I'd be pulling 7mph on a treadmill and have a pulse around 50... what's up w. that?
     
    avatar
    Rakesh2011 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
    Thanks so much Cardiostar!
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to Rakesh2011's response:
    You're welcome Rakesh.

    Take good care,

     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to An_193026's response:
    Hi An_133789:

    "a drop in my pulse/bp while I'm working out"

    "what's up w. that?"


    Do consult with a/your doctor promptly on that.

    Normally, heart rate, as well as blood pressure, should rise gradually/accordingly during exercise/to the intensity of the exercise.

    Take care,

    C*




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    Be well-informed

    WebMD

    Target Heart Rate Calculator

    When you exercise, your body speeds up, and so does your heart as it works to meet your increased energy needs.

    But how much speeding-up of your heart is safe when you exercise? You need the answer to this question in order to maximize your exercise benefits while not overworking your heart.

    Your target heart rate isn't one rate but a range of rates (beats per minute, or bpm), expressed as percentages of your maximum heart rate, that are safe for you to reach during exercise. For most healthy people, the American Heart Association recommends an exercise target heart rate ranging from 50% to 75% of your maximum......

    http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/healthtool-target-heart-rate-calculator

    American Heart Association - Live and Learn

    Target Heart Rates

    SEE Table for estimated target heart rates for different ages.

    Age - Target HR zone 50-85% - Average Maximum HR 100%

    Your maximum heart rate is about 220 minus your age

    http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4736


    PLUS

    WebMD

    In the Recent Media

    The Heart Beat with James Beckerman, MD, FACC

    The Old and New Numbers for Heart Rates

    http://blogs.webmd.com/heart-disease/2010/07/the-old-and-new-numbers-for-heart-rates.html

    -

    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .

    It's your future......be there.

    . .

    WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    NEVER
    delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on WebMD.

    If you have a medical emergency, call 911.
     
    avatar
    anurag__jain responded:
    For me its always over 65, is that bad?
     
    avatar
    mivers1 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
    About heart rate and blood pressure, There must be something wrong with me, when ever I wake up be it middle of the night or first thing in the morning, my bp is always high 140/ 85 or higher and heart rate 72 or more, when ever I have worked out in the yard or did a mile walk or what ever I check my bp and it is always a lot lower then it is first thing in the morning, normally around 118/71 heart 62. Don.t figure..
     
    avatar
    sab0101 responded:
    is it normal to to be at below 50 pulse rate when sleeping
     
    avatar
    sab0101 responded:

    Following are the details that might be helpful to you. I just wanted to know why my pulse rate is low (around 45-50 beats per minute) in the morning immediately after I get up from sleep?
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to sab0101's response:
    Hi:

    When Is Sinus Bradycardia Considered Normal?

    Quite often, sinus bradycardia is completely normal. Healthy young people, and even older people when they are in good physical condition, will frequently have resting heart rates in the 40s or 50s. It is also common (and normal) to have heart rates in this range while sleeping.

    http://heartdisease.about.com/od/palpitationsarrhythmias/a/Sinus-Bradycardia.htm


    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    -

    -

    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .

    It's your future......be there.

    . .

    WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


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