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Meds after triple bypass surgery
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mivers1 posted:
I am 70 yrs. young, I had bypas surgery in July 2010, My doctor put me on Carvedilol 3.125mg twice a day, I understand that someone with asthma should not take a Beta Blocker, I asked my pharmacist and he said that they can weaken my lungs, Weaker lungs I do not need ,, I ask my doctor and he said" We'll see" I have never had high blood pressure or high cholesterol, I also take 40mg of cholesterol drugs. I seems to me that a ACE inhibitor might be better, I am in pretty good shape, I walk a mile about every day, as long as I take my albuterol I do fine. What do you think???
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BillH99 responded:
You did not indicate why you had a bypass.

Usually beta blockers are given for hearts that have been damaged such as from a heart attack.

It is also given for high blood pressure, but many doctors don't think that it is best option for initial BP control.

Now I did not if this is universal with most cardiologist, but I had bypass a little over a year ago and was never on a beta blocker. But I never had an MI or angina. Mine only cause shortness of breath during exercise.

When I went through cardiac rehab I was the only one that was not on a beta blocker, but also the only that did not have an MI.

But I am on an ACE for high BP. And ACE's also have some affect on helping damaged hearts. But I don't know how much one helps more than the other. Or the if they both help in the same way.

Now any medicine is a trade off of the benefits vs the risks. And each person is different.

Also there are different types of beta blockers. Some are non-selective and others work more on specific different parts of the body.

And I don't know how bad your pulmonary problems are.

I would talk with your pulmonary doctor and see if he thinks that this is a problem for you. If he thinks so then have him work with the cardiologist to see if a different beta blocker or a different class of meds will work for you.
 
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James Beckerman, MD, FACC responded:
Beta-blockers don't weaken the lungs, but can cause some constriction (and symptoms) in some people with asthma. However, many people with asthma do tolerate them.

Beta-blockers are generally recommended in people who (1) have had a heart attack, (2) have weakened hearts for other reasons, or (3) have heart rhythm issues such as SVT or atrial fibrillation. While it's true that many people are put on beta-blockers after heart surgery to reduce the risk of heart rhythm issues in the post-operative period, there is a very reasonable argument to consider discontinuing them in some individuals after a period of time - talk about it with your doctor!
 
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mivers1 replied to James Beckerman, MD, FACC's response:
The reason that I had surgery was that my wife noticed when we walk for any distance at all that my breathing had started to become more labored, I guess you call that short of breath, So,,, I went and seen my doctor and he took some blood tests and found something in my blood that warranted an angioplasty, they found one artery that was 85 % blocked and two others about the same, I never (that I can remember) had any chest pains. didn't know that my heart was in such in such condition. I always though that it was my asthma making my breathing labored. Thank you for your replys , I can't get much info from my doctor about my meds or about alternatives meds.


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