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chest pain while smoking
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An_193071 posted:
I'm a 25 yo male who smokes heavily. I am 5'8" and weigh 185 lbs. I smoke an average of 15 cigarettes a day. More recently than before I developed chest pains while smoking. Anywhere from dull to sharp stabbing pains. I have also been diagnosed with asthma and taking advair and an albuteral inhalor. The obvious solution is to stop smoking, but was wondering if there is a logical reason behind the pain. Although sometimes I do get these chest pains at random times doing anything from walking or standing still, but almost always while smoking. During the chest pains I have no other symptoms to my knowledge, as in don't feel weak, tired, or heart racing or skipping beats.
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi:

Do quit smoking ASAP, and consult with your doctor promptly.

Smoking is a major independent risk factor for coronary artery disease, which often leads to heart attacks. As reported, smoking increases the circulating levels of catecholamines and free fatty acids, which may contribute to the increased level of total cholesterol and decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein (the good/protective cholesterol) that are found in habitual cigarette smokers.

The effects on platelets may enhance coagulation (blood clotting). There can be accelerated coronary and peripheral vascular disease, and occurrence of a dreaded brain attack and complications from hypertension.

The greatest concern is the acceleration or aggravation of cardiovascular disease. Smoking can promote atherosclerotic vascular disease by contributing to high cholesterol, endothelial injury (damaging the sensitive inner lining of the walls of the arteries), or both.

Complications of hypertension are more severe in those who smoke cigarettes. Smoking can also aggravate hypertension by causing vasoconstriction (narrowing/tightening of the vessels).

Additionally, it has been known for quite some time now that atherosclerosis begins (the process and progression of) at a very early age, even as early as in the pre-teen/teenage years.

Studies performed in the past have shown fatty streaks (represents the earliest precursor to plaque development and plaque is the pathological hallmark of atherosclerosis) as the beginning of atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. Soft plaque (more dangerous and unpredictable than hard or calcified plaque) is the early stage of atherosclerosis.

ALWAYS be proactive in your health care and treatment. Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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Be well-informed

After You Quit Smoking - The First 2 Days

Quit Smoking Benefits - the Healing Begins...When you quit smoking, the benefits begin within minutes of your last...

At 20 minutes after quitting:

Blood pressure decreases, pulse rate drops...

http://quitsmoking.about.com/cs/afterquitting/a/quitting20minut.htm

Still trying to quit? 3 Tips!

http://forums.webmd.com/3/heart-disease-exchange/forum/3145?@guest@

USA Today

Just one cigarette can harm DNA, Surgeon General says

12/9/10

"Tobacco smoke damages almost every organ in your body," says Surgeon General Regina Benjamin. In someone with underlying heart disease, she says, "One cigarette can cause a heart attack."

http://www.usatoday.com/yourlife/health/2010-12-09-1Asmoking09_st_N.htm


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Good to know, for the primary/secondary prevention of heart attack/brain attack

Epidemiologic studies have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel, emerging) for atherosclerosis, which includes age, gender, genetics, diabetes, smoking (also secondhand), inactivity, obesity, hypertension, high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

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Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society


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It's your future......be there. :-)


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WebMD/WebMD health exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


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