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scar tissue causes
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soldierone posted:
I have an arrythmia and PVCs and underwent a cardiac catheter ablation about one year ago. The cardiologist stated the focal scarring which is (still) causing the problem could be the result of prior heart attack, rheumatic fever, exposure to radiation or toxins. I have no history or evidence of past heart attack, rheumatic fever, nor to my knowledge exposure to radiation; however as a Vietnam Veteran I was exposed to toxins (I.E. Agent Orange and other potent herbicides). The Veterans Administration has not commented one this statement and none of the literature I have read nor internet searches have mentioned exposure to "toxins" as a possible cause. Has anyone heard of this as a possible cause of focal scarring of the heart muscle? Is there any research or published data that would support this statement?
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi:

"Could be the result of prior heart attack"

"I have no history or evidence of past heart attack"


Noteworthy, as applicable, a "silent MI" may/can occur.

L@@K Back in the Media

CNN Health

Silent' heart attacks more common than thought, study says - April 21, 2009

Silent heart attacks affect nearly 200,000 people in the United States annually

Although many people think of a heart attack as a painful, sometimes fatal event, there are some heart attacks that go entirely unnoticed......

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/04/21/silent.heart.attacks/index.html

ALWAYS be proactive in your health care and treatment. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctors.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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Be well-informed

Heart-Healthy Foods

Avoid foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Choose skim or low-fat milk, low-fat yogurt and reduced-fat cheeses. Eat more fish and poultry. Limit servings to five to seven ounces a day. Trim visible fat. Limit egg yolks. Substitute two egg whites for one whole egg or use an egg-substitute. Eat more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, breads and cereals. Use less salt and fat. Season with herbs and spices rather than with sauces, gravies and butter

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Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel, or emerging) for atherosclerosis (typically affecting the carotid, coronary, and peripheral arteries), which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation), diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes second and thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity") high blood pressure (hypertension), high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP)

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Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

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It's your future......be there. :-)


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WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
 
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soldierone replied to CardiostarUSA1's response:
If you have a "silent heartattack", wouldn't there be evidence that would show it had occurred? In numerous tests over the years I was repeatedly told there was "no evidence" of a previous heart attack.
 
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CardiostarUSA1 replied to soldierone's response:
Hi:

"Wouldn't there be evidence that would show it had occurred?"

Sometimes yes, sometimes no, especally if there is/was only a small area of damage.

"In numerous tests over the years I was repeatedly told there was 'no evidence' of a previous heart attack."


Sometimes, a condition can be misinterpreted, overlooked, or completetely missed with this or that diagnostic test.

Good general info -

HeartSite

EKG

It is important to remember that EKGs are not 100% accurate. Normal recordings can be obtained in patients with significant heart disease , or some "abnormalities" may exist in the presence of a normal heart.

http://www.heartsite.com/html/ekg.html

Imaging Ischemia or a Heart Attack

Isotope/Nuclear Stress Test

SEE: Actual rest/stress nuclear images

The physician can separate a normal left ventricle, from ischemia (live muscle with flow that is compromised only during exercise) and the scar tissue of a heart attack. The distinction is made in the following way.......

http://www.heartsite.com/html/isotope_stress.html

Take good care,

CardioStar*

 
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soldierone replied to CardiostarUSA1's response:
Neither of these responses answer my initial basic question which was "Has anyone heard of this (exposure to toxins) as a possible cause of focal scarring of the heart muscle? Is there any research or published data that would support this statement?

I appreciate the advice on healthy eating and other habits, but I'm already aware of and following these.
 
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CardiostarUSA1 replied to soldierone's response:
"Neither of these responses answer my initial basic question"

Well, at least you now know about silent heart attacks (which many are still not aware of), and that sometimes, evidence of a heart attack may not show up on a particular diagnostic test.

Regarding Agent Orange, as deemed applicable to the individual, if it has contributed to or caused ischemic heart disease, this may/can lead to a heart attack, which of course, results in scarring of the heart muscle (myocardium).

L@@K Back in the Media

Agent Orange Linked to Serious Heart Disease

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32126468/ns/health-health_care/t/agent-orange-linked-serious-heart-disease


CardioStar*




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WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


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