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abbrooks posted:
my husband just recently died and the ME gave me 2 reasons one being cardiomyopathy. Not sure exactly which one but I know from his last blood workup his cholesterol was high and his triglycerides were 567. The doctor never did anything about those results like more tests or medication... if you were the doctor wouldn't those results be a warning sign? AND.. if you were tested and found to have Hep C antibodies but not the virus would that be a virus that could affect the heart? I am confused and really upset about the fact that this could have been treated or preventable from those lab numbers. Someone please help me to understand.
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Cactibabe1 responded:
So sorry about your loss. Your not alone let those who love you support you now. You never can understand why information that may be important is not shared. There could be any number of reasons that only make sense to those involved. Perhaps out of love for you your spouse may not have wanted you worried with the information. Thinking they could handle it alone. You never can figure it out. You have enough on your plate now and stressing over this adds to it. This is the anger stage of grief and you have reason to feel this way. Big step is you have acknowledged it. Now you must find a place to put it where it does not harm you from stress. Take care of You. Ronnie D. :-)
 
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi:

Sorry to hear about your husband.

"One being cardiomyopathy. Not sure exactly which one but I know from his last blood workup his cholesterol was high and his triglycerides were 567."

Cardiomyopathy is a serious condition. As applicable, there is a condition, specifically called ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), in which the heart has reduced pumping function due to coronary artery disease (CAD). There may/can be congestive heart failure (CHF) as well.

Also, high cholesterol and high triglycerides are major risk factors for (CAD), which often leads to heart attack, that sometimes can be instantly fatal (or delayed-fatal).

"The doctor never did anything about those results like more tests or medication... if you were the doctor wouldn't those results be a warning sign?"

For sure.

"If you were tested and found to have Hep C antibodies but not the virus would that be a virus that could affect the heart?"

Sounds unlikely, though anything is seemingly possible today.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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Be well-informed

WebMD

Cardiomyopathy

Main types

Cardiomyopathy (dilated, hypertrophic, or restrictive)

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/muscle-cardiomyopathy

American Heart Association

Cardiomyopathy

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4468


The Cardiomyopathy Association

http://www.cardiomyopathy.org

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WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men and Women

Acquired or congenital (born with it)

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men


SYMPTOMS


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

Mayo Clinic

Heart Disease

Definition. Symptoms. Causes. Risk factors. Complications. Tests and diagnosis. Prevention......

Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart, and in some cases, your blood vessels. The various diseases that fall under the umbrella of......

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120


LEARN ABOUT the Heart



WebMD

The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart


WebMD Health/The Cleveland Clinic

How the Healthy Heart Works

Arteries, Chambers, Valves

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/healthy-heart-works


Your-Doctor

How the Heart Pumps

Animated Tutorial

http://your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/heartpump-tutorial.html


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HeartSite

Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

http://www.heartsite.com


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Good to know, for the primary/secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack

Epidemiologic studies have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel, emerging) for atherosclerosis (typically affects carotid, coronary, peripheral arteries), which includes age, gender, genetics, diabetes, smoking (includes second/thirdhand), inactivity, obesity, hypertension, high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine (now iffy), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

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Quote!

Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society


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WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatments.


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