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    Is This The Right Board for a Stroke?
    avatar
    JTC1003 posted:
    Something happened to me last night, and I think maybe I had a stroke. I'm a 59 year old man and I have many health issues. I have HBP but it's fairly well controlled with 3 meds. I also have a Mitral Valve Prolapse. There is probably something else with the heart, but it's undiagnosed.

    I have insomnia but I also sleep walk a lot, and about a year ago I started to fall while sleep walking. It doesn't happen every night. But last night I think it happened 5 times. I'm pretty bruised up today. But what makes me ask about a stroke is that my left leg is somewhat numb, a bit swollen. Especially my left foot. I also feel like there is something stuck under my left foot, but there is nothing there. So I feel lumpy sensations. The worst thing is I'm having a hard time lifting my left leg when I walk. Of course I did fall 5 times and I'm not sure what I landed on each time.

    Does this sound like a stroke? How would I know if I had a stroke? Are there minor strokes? And what kind of doc would be able to tell me I had a stroke?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    CardiostarUSA1 responded:
    Hi:

    About a year ago I started to fall while sleep walking. It doesn't happen every night. But last night I think it happened 5 times. I'm pretty bruised up today"


    "What makes me ask about a stroke is that my left leg is somewhat numb, a bit swollen".


    Numbness or tingling (paresthesias) is one of the general symptoms of brain attack (stroke), while swelling isn't.

    "Does this sound like a stroke?"

    One would tend to think not, going on what you have described here.

    "How would I know if I had a stroke?"

    There typically (but not 100% always) would be tell-tale signs.

    "Are there minor strokes?"

    Yes, and even silent ones.

    "And what kind of doc would be able to tell me I had a stroke?"

    An ER doctor, primary care physician, internist, neurologist.

    Most important, if you believe/suspect.think that you have had something as serious as a brain attack occur, remember that Time is Brain...DON'T let a stroke BLOW your MIND!

    ALWAYS be proactive in you health care and treatment.
    Best of luck down the road of life.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)




    -

    -

    Be well-informed

    As Applicable (must be 100% confirmed)

    Patient Resources

    American Stroke Association

    http://www.strokeassociation.org

    National Stroke Association

    http://www.stroke.org

    HealthBoards

    Stroke Message board

    http://www.healthboards.com/boards/forumdisplay.php?f=119

    -

    About brain attack (stroke)

    Right hemisphere

    A stroke that involves the right hemisphere (side) of the brain can cause difficulties on the left side of the body including weakness (hemiparesis), paralysis (hemiplegia), lack of coordination of the arm, leg, and face, lack of sensation in the left side of the body, an overall lack of peripheral vision, problems judging distances, and an inability to think straight (clearly).

    Left hemisphere

    A stroke that involves the left hemisphere of the brain can cause difficulties on the right side of the body including weakness, paralysis, lack of coordination of the arm, leg, and face, lack of sensation in the right side of the body, aphasia (e.g., slurred/distorted speech, difficulty listening, writing, reading, difficulty understanding numbers and an individual's speech), and slow, cautious, or disorganized behavior.

    -

    WebMD/WebMD Health Exchanges DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

    NEVER delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on WebMD.

    IF YOU have a medical emergency CALL 911.

     
    avatar
    Haylen_WebMD_Staff responded:
    JTC1003,

    From the WebMD Stroke Health Center :

    Initial treatment for a stroke happens in the hospital. The sooner you get treatment, the better . The worst damage from a stroke often occurs within the first few hours. The faster you receive treatment, the less damage will occur.

    Please get to the hospital immediately!

    Haylen

    p.s. After the hospital, click here for the WebMD Stroke Community with expert Richard C Senelick, MD


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