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    Is Lyrica safe?
    avatar
    LaWana71 posted:
    Can you safely take Lyrica, for back and nerve pain, if you are a heart patient? I have had a silent heart attack but don't know when it happened. I have a stent in my right coronary artery. I am doing great at this time. I carefully watch what i eat, no red meat, very little salt etc..Thanks for any reply!
    Reply
     
    avatar
    Haylen_WebMD_Staff responded:
    Here is a link where you can find a wealth of information including patient reviews:

    WebMD Drugs & Medications A - Z

    However, please see your doctor before stopping or starting any medication. And make sure any doctor prescribing for you has a complete, up-to-date medical history!

    Haylen
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    Safety matters can not be properly addressed via the Internet (which has serious limitations/restrictions).

    Generalized info-only

    Patients with a history of heart disease or kidney failure should inform their doctor when taking Lyrica.

    Remember, you and your doctor are a team. So be sure to ask questions and keep him or her informed if you are feeling side effects.

    http://www.lyrica.com

    Additionally here, coronary stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting) are only a Band-aid or spot-treatment, as it doesn't address the disease process and what drives the progression.

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a lifelong unpredictable (may/can exhibit periods of stabilization, acceleration and even some regression) condition requiring a continuum of care.

    Best of luck down the road of life.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



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    -

    Patient resources

    Ask A Patient

    Rate a drug, side effects, comments, etc.

    http://askapatient.com/rateyourmedicine.htm

    iGuard

    http://www.iguard.org

    Drugstore com

    Drug Interaction Checker

    Prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs may interact with other drugs, foods, beverages and dietary supplements.

    http://www.drugstore.com/pharmacy/drugchecker


    -

    Learn About the


    WebMD

    The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

    http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

    -

    HeartSite

    Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, diagnostic images.

    http://www.heartsite.com

    -

    WebMD

    Living with Coronary artery disease (CAD)

    CAD is a chronic disease with no cure. When you have CAD, it is important to take care...

    This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or......

    Recognize the symptoms......

    Reduce your risk factors......

    Take your medications......

    See your doctor for regular check-ups...
    ...

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease


    -


    Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

    Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (some new, novel or emegring) for atherosclerosis (typically affecting the carotid, coronary and peripheral arteries), which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation, diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes secondand thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global edpidemic, "globesity"), high blood pressure (hypertension), high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine (now iffy), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).


    -


    Quote!



    "Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"


    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .

    It's your future......be there.



    . .

    WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


    WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.



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