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pain and fluttering
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Anon_18983 posted:
I had a heart attack Feb 2010 with 3 stents inserted. In Aug 2011 taken off Plavix but still on aspirin. In the last month or so I have been having pains in my left rib area and the last couple of days have had fluttering in the front and back rib area. I lost my insurance no money for a dr visit. Any suggestions?
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"Any suggestions?"

Especially with your medical history and present symptoms, the ONLY logical suggestion is that you get thoroughly checked out by a qualified doctor ASAP.

"I lost my insurance, no money for a dr visit."

Patient resources

Many community clinics can offer personalized and high-quality health care, regardless of one's ability to pay. This decision is typically based on the size of one's family, household income and any other special circumstances.

If one has little or no income, donations and/or grants that some facilities receive, may/can make it possible for them to assist an individual on a limited or emergency basis.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Health Resources and Services Administration

HRSA-supported Health Centers

Find Affordable Health Care

Health centers are in most cities and many rural area. Health centers provide:

1. Checkups when you're well

2. Treatment when you're sick

3. Complete care when you're pregnant

4. Immunizations and checkups for your children

5. Dental care and prescription drugs for your family

6. Mental health and substance abuse care if you need it


http://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/Search_HCC.aspx

.

Especially after a heart attack has occurred, one should know his/her left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). This is the single-most important clinical indicator of how well the heart is pumping out blood from the left ventricle (LV).

Normal resting range LVEF is 50%-75%. Average reported is in the low to mid 60s. Under 50% enters into the realm of left ventricular dysfunction/heart failure territory that goes from mild to moderate to severe.

Cleveland Clinic

Understanding Your Ejection Fraction

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/heartfailure/ejectionfraction.aspx
The bottom line

Coronary stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting) are only a Band-aid or spot-treatment, as it doesn't address the disease process and what drives the progression.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a lifelong unpredictable (may/can exhibit periods of stabilization, acceleration and even some regression) condition requiring a continuum of care, as well as good doctor-patient/patient-doctor communication and understanding at ALL times.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD community member (since 8/99)

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Be well-informed

WebMD

More than 1 million Americans have heart attacks each year.

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-heart-attacks


WebMD

Living Coronary artery disease (CAD)

A chronic disease with no cure. When you have CAD, it is important to...

This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or...

Recognize the symptoms. Reduce your risk factors. Take your medications. See your doctor for regular check-ups...


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease

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Coronary artery anatomy

Starting with the LAD, the most critical, next to the ultra-critical LM.

http://www.heartsite.com/html/lad.html


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Good to know, for the primary/secondary prevention of heart attack/brain attack

Epidemiologic studies have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, typically affects carotid, coronary and peripheral arteries, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation), diabetes, smoking (includes second and thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity"), hypertension, low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

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Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

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It's your future......be there.

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

 
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jamesandtina replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Thank you
no one has ever told me my LVEF
I will call the dr on Mon


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