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Beta Blockers Only Meds Bringing Down Blood Pressure...Need Advice
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summersoff7 posted:
I read online that calcium channel blockers or some other kind of blood pressure med should be prescribed as a first line of defense to preventing a first heart attack. Well, I was on a calcium channel blocker for a month and it didn't budge my blood pressure. Then, I went on a beta blocker and whoosh! It came down 25 points top and bottom.
So, how should I view this? Should I continue on with the beta blocker even though I never had a heart attack even though it works or should I persevere and go back on a calcium channel blocker?
Thanks!
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billh99 responded:
I think that you have some things confused.

One primary way to protect against heart attacks and strokes is to maintain a normal blood pressure.

And the first way to help maintain normal BP is healthy lifestyles. That is to eat healthy foods, lose weight if needed, get regular exercise, and control stress.

Often doctors don't stress this as they find that many people won't take the effort to change.

If the lifestyle changes are enough then meds are prescribed.

There are several different classes of BP meds.
Diuretics
ACEinhibitors (and ABR's for those that can't handle the ACEi).
Calcium Channel Blockers
Beta Blockers

Now each of these meds work in different ways and have different "side effects". And when tested in large groups of people some of the classes have less heart attacks then others even if the same BP is reached.

But the "idea" class of BP med differs by different age and ethnic groups. But, in general ACEi and CCB are two of the best and reasonable for a 1st try.

But in reality everyone is an individual. And reducing the BP is the main goal.

In your case the beta blocker seems to work while the CCB did not.


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