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heart problems ?
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An_247343 posted:
Hi, I am 48 years old, I had some chest pains with pains in my arms about 2 months ago and went to hospital which my bloodpressure was 165/81. They started me on a patch of nitro and bp meds and keep me in the hospital for 3 days. The Dr. did a stress test which i couldnt finish but he said he couldnt find anything wrong. Well I have been haveing pains in both my arms for a week now, having hot flashes, tired all the time and now having light headed. Some pains in chest but not really bad very light, but i can take alot of pain. Just wondering if you think I should go back to the hospital.
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billh99 responded:
Yes, those are symptoms that need to be checked out. And with your history going to the hospital would prudent.

The Dr. did a stress test which i couldnt finish but he said he couldnt find anything wrong.

That does not make sense. If you failed the stress test then usually other tests are run.

You need to be your own best doctor and ask for details of what the test finds and what it means. Just saying a test is normal or abnormal is really not enough.
 
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deadmanwalking57 responded:
I passed two stress tests with excellent results one year and four years before bypass surgery. I had collateral circulation that masked severe blockages and allowed me to exercise.

I finally started having massive angina, and when an angiogram was done, they asked how long I had been bedridden prior to coming to the hospital. I had never been in pain before, or short of breath except for valve issues, which I had recovered from.

With the three major cardiac arteries all massively blocked, they operated on me the next day to bypass them. How severe ? 99%, 99%, and the "good one" at 80%, with another dozen smaller arteries at 80% blocked and inoperable.

Your symptoms tell you something is extremely wrong. When it come to the heart, tolerating pain is the worst thing you can do. Potentially, you are allowing sections of your heart muscle to die. NOT a good idea. See your doctor, and plan to adopt a very low fat, high anti-oxidant diet.

DMW
 
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An_247583 replied to deadmanwalking57's response:
DMW is right, symptoms tell you something is wrong. And stress tests do not always show up problems.

I am a 66 year old female. I work out six days a week and appear to be quite healthy. A few years ago, I had very severe chest pressure several different times - once I spent two days and the night in the hospital after going to the emergency room - having ALL kinds of tests. They complimented me on how well I did on the stress test. Nothing.

I continued to have severe pressure episodes a couple more times. And I KNEW SOMETHING WAS WRONG. So, they did a heart cath - just to "be sure." I was shocked to learn I had three blockages - 70%, 80%, and 90%. They would not even allow me to go home to get a toothbrush before emergency triple bypass surgery early the next morning. That was two years ago.

A few weeks ago, I had another "heart event" - same severe pressure. Found nothing in the emergency room. Passed the stress test again, two EKGs, etc. But, again, I knew something was wrong!

A few days later they did a CTA and found two 100% blocked bypassed. We are waiting to see what we can do with stronger meds, but if I have any more symptoms, the doctor says I may need a stent. Bottom line - if you EVEN THINK you have a heart problem, especially if you are a woman like me and keep being told it is "probably indigestion" do not let up until you are satisfied with the right answers.

Women drop dead of heart attacks all the time because they do not "fit the profile" like a man does.
 
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Jesed responded:
The BP is a little high but may be controllable with medication, but that's not your question. I have learned that chest pain can be referred from other organs - I too, at 82 have just gone through very similar circumstances. Isosorbide has, I believe, relieved all pain. I have recently been diagnosed and treated for H Pylori and some lterature suggests it can mimic heart induced chest pain; as can esophageal spasms and other sneaky stuff.

I became interested, however, in what is termed varient angina; particularly Prinzmetals angina. I had some suggestions for a beta blocker but, again research revealed that with a varient angina condition this could advesely affect the Alpha Receptors; not that I know any more beyond that. The Isorsobide was termed by a very good internest as a "good drug" as it dilates the vasculr blood vessals so there is a lower load on the heart.

No suggestions or recommendations- just recitation.

JustEd

 
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James Beckerman, MD, FACC responded:
I would recommend that you have things checked out.

While a normal stress test can be encouraging, your post suggests that the stress might not have been the best assessment ("I couldnt finish") - and sometimes stress tests can be falsely encouraging.

Based upon your symptoms, and any risk factors for heart disease (like smoking, high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol) your doctor might recommend further evaluation.
 
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sahasrangshu responded:
Hi,

It does not mean that you have no heart disease with an inconclusive stress test.You must undergo an ECG,Echocardiography or a PET Scan of your heart.The pains in the arms could be well due to Cervical Spondylosis.So you need to undergo an X-Ray of cervical spine.You need to cut down your BP through healthier life style changes and Anti hypertensive medication as per the advice of your doctor.Climacteric or approaching menopause could well be the culprit in female subjects of your age.Do not be anxious but please contact your doctor and discuss with him or her with the points that I have mentioned.

Regards

Dr.Saurabh Gupta(Doctor from Calcutta).


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