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Baroreceptor dysfunction and general anesthesia
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jenny198131 posted:
Hi !

I'll try to do my best for the explanation, I not pretty good in english

I'm a 31 years old woman, dont smoke or drink, eating pretty well etc.

At the age of 12 I was weighting 210pounds. I've lost weight rapidly at the age 14 (lost approx.90 pounds in 9 months). After that weight loss I began to have "malaises" (lightheadness a lot). Probably low blood pressure problems and fatigue a lot.
I've smoke weed too when I was a teenager but had to stop because I was fainting :S.

I've ALWAYS had problems doing exercises too (after that weight loss). Become week very rapidly, feeling unwell (lighthead +++++++). At the age of 21 I decide to go to the gym and have to quit after a few times, I was pale like a gost and almost fainted.

After I had my first child, i've gained weight, gone to 200 pounds again.... and lost it again but over a few years. It was not drastic like the first time.
Over the years I develop many problems. Very very low blood pressure. Tachycardia (130 BPM approx) sometimes when I try to get up in the night to go to the bathroom. I have a lots of problems getting up. I feel like a pressure that go down from my belly to my legs, feel SO tired, heart beating VERY fast. The same thing happen when it's hot outside, its VERY difficult for me in hot temperature. Have a lot more problems doing exercises. This "condition" is really not easy for me.
And if I go back a few years ago, i've NEVER had problem at the dentist etc. Now, when I have an injection, I have big big malaises, near fainting and feeling unwell the rest of the day. I have other teeth to repare and don't want to go because of this

I've seen an electrophysiologist that said that I probably have baroreceptor dysfunctions. I've pass test in the pass, electrocardiogram, stress test, 1 echo, everything seem normal.
After those tests, if everything looks normal, can you say that EVERYTHING is normal ?

I have a history of anxiety too... But the anxiety developp +++ because of all the malaises I have since my first weight loss.

I bought a machine to mesure blood pressure and sometimes when I'm very relax, it can be 80/50.

I don't know what to do about this at all

And now, i'm anxious because i'm suppose to have a surgery (general anesthesia) and i'm VERY afraid that I can die because of all this. I say to myself that maybe they didn't see something when I passed all the tests etc.

I would like to have the opinion of others about all this.

Thanks a lot and sorry again for my english
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"I'm suppose to have a surgery (general anesthesia) and I'm VERY afraid that I can die because of all this."

Any concerns or worries obviously must be discussed in advance with the anesthesiologist and the doctor performing the surgery.

"I bought a machine to measure blood pressure and sometimes when I'm very relaxed, it can be 80/50."

Normal resting blood pressure (BP) in adults is under 120/80 with 115/75 or 110/70 considered as being optimal/ideal. Under 90/60 is defined as low blood pressure (hypotension), which is ok, that is, unless it causes concerning symptoms such as lightheadedness or dizziness,weakness, confusion or syncope (a temporary loss of consciousness, includes passing out and fainting)

As reported, compensatory mechanisms that control BP involves changing the diameter of veins and small arteries (arterioles), the amount of blood pumped out from the heart per minute (cardiac output), and the volume of blood in the vessels. Sometimes an imbalance somewhere within the body's precise regulating systems can occur.

"I've seen an electrophysiologist that said that I probably have baroreceptor dysfunctions."

Receptors (termed baroceptors) monitor the BP and make changes to help maintain a fairly constant BP, in particular, when an individual changes postions (lying down, sitting up, standing up, bending over) or activities. The baroceptors become less sensitive with aging, and though uncommon, when age is not an issue, can become damaged or dysfunctional.

"Over the years I develop many problems. Very very low blood pressure. Tachycardia (130 BPM approx) sometimes when I try to get up in the night to go to the bathroom."

Additonal info

Baroceptor reflex

This is the system in the human body that regulates BP. Special nerve cells called baroceptors are located in the wall of the heart auricles (small conical pouch which projects
from the uppper front part of each atrium, the upper receiving or priming chambers), vena cava, arotic arch, and carotid sinuses, and are specialized to monitor changes in BP.

If the receptors sense a rise in blood pressure, then, through a negative feedback loop, the heart will slow down to compensate, if they sense a drop in blood pressure, the heart will speed up.

Additionally, as applicable to the patient, there is a specific condition known as postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), in which the heart rate increases substationally (goes into the tachy range of over 100 beats per minute) upon standing up from a lying down or sitting postion.

Best of luck with your upcoming surgery and down the road of life Live long and prosper.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

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Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTION. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

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jenny198131 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Thanks a lot for your detailled answer.

But why since a few years I nearly faint when I have an injection. Why at those time, my heart don't compensate like when I'm in hot temperature or try to get up ? It's like my system is all off-balance
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to jenny198131's response:
You're welcome.

"It's like my system is all off-balance."

It does seem that way.

"But why since a few years I nearly faint when I have an injection?"

In general, and at any time, one may/can experience a real bad or adverse reaction or sometimes it can be a so-called 'psychogenic' effect, that is, actually originating in the mind.

As a randomly-selected example only, the possible side effects/adverse reactions from local anesthetic bupivacaine include Cardiovascular: hypertension (high blood pressure), hypotension (low blood pressure), tachycardia, bradycardia, palpitations (premature atrial or ventricular contractions, PAC, PVCs), ventricular tachycardia (a dangerously fast heartbeat). Nervous system: Lightheadedness/dizziness, headache, somnolence, pallor, syncope, temporary loss of consciousness, includes pasing out or fainting), insomnia, pain, chills, paresthesia, tremors, and increased body temperature.

Sometimes, the individual may experience the same or similar reaction when encountering hot/humid temperatures or when changing positions.

Do make sure that ALL the necessary precautions are taken before the surgery, to help ensure that it goes without a hitch, textbook perfect.

Take good care,

CardioStar*

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Additional info

Adverse reactions to local anesthetics - Dentist

http://www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-20/issue-10/departments/medical-alert/adverse-reactions-to-local-anesthetics.html

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Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTION. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there.

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
 
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jenny198131 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Ok thanks a lot again.

The dentist give me the anesthetic without adrenaline in it since I have tachycardia sometimes. Like I said, I wasn't like that before. Even my emotions are a lot more intenses than before, it's not just "physic". I'm like HYPER sensitive to EVERYTHING. I wonder sometimes if it's just because of stress and bad things that happened in the past, bad experiences.... :S Can your system become all bizarre like this ONLY because of stress and negative things, over time ?
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to jenny198131's response:
You're welcome.

"I wonder sometimes if it's just because of stress and bad things that happened in the past, bad experiences."

It may/could be.

And beyond that, some studies have revealed that there may/can be a whole lot going on in the subconscious brain (at the subsconscious level).

"Can your system become all bizarre like this ONLY because of stress and negative things, over time?"

It's possible, in fact, anything medical is seemingly possible today, especially since everyone is unique.

It is well known that stress can cause various symptoms, even wreaking havoc on the entire body, especially in the long run.

CardioStar*

-

-

Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTION. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there.

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


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