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    So many questions about his heart
    avatar
    doemc posted:
    This is the first time I have posted and I am hoping to get some honest suggestions before my son see's the specialist.
    My 17 yr old son was watching TV, he had a headache, felt tired but when he laid down his heart started racing. When we arrived at the hospital his heart rate was at 200, his blood pressure165/99 after working on him for 5 hrs they were able to bring his rate to 98, his blood pressure to 132/74. We were originally told that because of something to due with delta pattern he had Wolff-parkinson white syndrome w/reentry tachycardia. Course of action would be mapped. He was sent to another hospital for treatment because he is 4 mos away from being 18 and the pediatric cardiologist said that there are symptoms there but that they are not sure so they will just treat him for now with blood pressure meds. I need to know what kind of questions will gain me more answers from the specialist next week. We are scared, confused and frustrated that no one gives us the same direction.
    Reply
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    "We were originally told that because of something to due with delta pattern he had Wolff-parkinson white syndrome w/reentry tachycardia. Course of action would be mapped."

    ......"and the pediatric cardiologist said that there are symptoms there but that they are not sure so they will just treat him for now with blood pressure meds."

    "I need to know what kind of questions will gain me more answers......"

    To help formulate some questions, read up as much has possible on Wolff-Parkinson White Syndrome (WPWS), which is a form of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT, fast heart rate originating above the ventricles). In 1930, Wolff, Parkinson and White described a distinct pattern (delta wave) on an electrocardiogram (ECG).




    Cleveland Clinic

    Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    How is Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome treated?

    Treatment depends on the type of arrhythmias, the frequency and the associated symptoms.

    Observation

    If you have no symptoms, you may not require treatment. Your doctor MAY CHOOSE to have regular follow-up without treatment.

    Medications

    A variety of drugs are available to treat arrhythmias. Because EVERYONE IS DIFFERENT, it may take trials of several medications and doses to find the one that works best for you.

    Ablation

    In people with WPW, whose heart rate CAN NOT be controlled with medications, ablation can improve symptoms and cure the abnormal arrhythmias.......

    http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/electric/wpw.aspx
    .

    Additionally here, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) or paroxsymal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), which has various causes or triggers, typically causes a frightening burst/surge in heart/pulse rate that begins/starts and ends/stops suddenly (hence the term paroxsymal), which can last for just mere seconds or it can continue on for minutes to hours to days. SVT can send the heart into speeds up to 150-200 BPM, and sometimes, even as high as 300 BPM.

    Symptoms that may/can occur with SVT, PSVT includes chest pain/discomfort/pressure/tightness, shortness of breath, lightheadedness/dizziness, and in uncommon to rare cases, syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, which includes passing out and fainting).

    Best of luck to your son down the road of life. May he live long and prosper.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)

    -

    -


    Be well-informed

    As Applicable

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Heart Disease and Electrophysiology Testing

    Why Do I Need an Electrophysiology Study?

    To determine
    the cause of an abnormal heart rhythm.

    To locate the site of origin of an abnormal heart rhythm

    To decide the best treatment for an abnormal heart rhythm.

    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/diagnosing-electrophysiology

    -

    LEARN ABOUT the heart's delicate and precise electrical conduction system

    Animated Tutorial

    http://your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/conductiontutorial.html

    Heart Rhythm Society

    Patients & Public Information Center

    http://www.hrspatients.org

    -

    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .

    WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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