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Scared I have an abdominal aorta problem :(
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CallMeBlondie posted:
I'm 21 and a female, I never noticed this until recently. I have General Anxiety Disorder and since about May it's been acting up really bad so I don't know if this could be a cause. Anyways, the past few months or so I've noticed a pulsing in my stomach and can feel it sometimes when I lean forward against a pillow. It doesn't really hurt and I don't feel a mass or anything, when I press on it I feel it pulsing with my heartbeat. I've read it's normal but I've also read it can also be symptom of an aneurysm and i'm terrified. I don't know what to think. Any help would be appreciated.
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

......"and I'm terrified. I don't know what to think"

All the more reason to see a/your doctor promptly and get a complete/thorough check-up, especially since various medical problems/conditions (some minor, some major) obviously may/can occur at any time and at ANY AGE.

General info

As applicable

Mayo Clinic

Abdominal aortic aneurysm

Tests and Diagnosis


http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/abdominal-aortic-aneurysm/DS01194/DSECTION=tests-and-diagnosis


Noteworthy, in some individuals, as applicable, more so if there is a bounding, firm, or strong pulse (for whatever reason, constant or briefly), they can see a rhythmic pulsing or throbbing (in-sync with the heartbeat) in a vein, such as in the hand, arm, or neck, simply because of their body habitus, e.g., thin or thin 'n tall build (or so-called being "thin-skinned") and physique. A pulsing in the chest, and sometimes in the abdomen/stomach, may/can be certainly felt and noticed as well.

Additionally, of the different types/kinds of heart conditions, various symptoms may/can be acute (occurring suddenly), be chronic (occurring over a long period of time), come and go (be transient, fleeting or episodic) or even be silent.

Best of luck down the road of life. Live long and prosper.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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High Blood Pressure, Fatty Deposits Are "bit players" in Bulging Arteries - Age, gender, body size are better predictors of aortic aneurysm; genetics likely important - 9/16/03

http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/medicine_health/report-21510.html


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