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    It's Never Too Late for a Heart Healthy Diet!
    avatar
    Haylen_WebMD_Staff posted:
    A new study shows older people with established heart disease who ate the most heart-healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, and nuts had a much lower risk of dying or having another heart attack or stroke than those who ate the unhealthiest diet.

    Click here for more details and specific benefits of a heart-healthy diet: Healthy Diet Helps Damaged Hearts

    Do you think about heart health when you plan meals and snacks?

    Haylen
    Reply
     
    avatar
    deadmanwalking57 responded:
    Haylen:

    A Heart Healthy Diet is my mantra. I am closing in on 7 years since my emergency triple bypass surgery for my large major blockages. All three cardiac mains, 99%, 99%, and 80% blocked. I had another dozen inoperable blockages.

    I rarely have any chest pain at all, and exercise almost every day.Saturday the 22nd I played volleyball with few breaks for three hours.

    People need to pay attention to any angina or chest discomfort they get and reflect on what they ate in the past 24 hours. Likely they had some high fat food.

    A sister in law just told me of numbness in her arm and pain in many muscles. This apparently came on a few hours after a big steak dinner. She has fibromyalgia like symptoms regularly. Turns out she also eats French rolls with lots of butter, and ham and cheese sandwiches with mayonnaise.

    No heart friendly nutrition there.

    The key to stop progression of heart disease is addition of high anti-oxidant foods throughout the day, and big reductions in oily or fatty foods.

    Then increase exercise,starting with whatever you can do, even if it is slow walking. Little by little the amount of time will increase, and then your speed will begin to improve as you slowly grow stronger. At almost any age.

    My Mother at 91 still walks a brisk pace. She had bypass surgery at 76.
     
    avatar
    SchwenLarson responded:
    Good post. I agree with eating for a healthy, healthy heart.


    Angela
     
    avatar
    debbielgolightly responded:
    February 26th will be my 3 year anniversary from Quadruple Bypass surgery. Changing my diet was one of the hardest things for me. Not that I necessarly ate bad before but after surgery I was so scared to eat anything unhealthy because I was terrified of going through bypass surgery again. Thus, my diet improved trememdously but it was really hard to learn the right things to have on hand especially with teenagers in the house. This is a great article.
    Deb http://survivingheartsurgery.com


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