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high bp and chest pain but stress test ok
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An_249400 posted:
A friend of mine has been experiencing bouts of very high blood pressure, chest pain, and extreme weakness for several weeks now. She has had a stress test which showed no problems. Her primary care physician sent her to a cardiologist who just told her that next time it happens, don't take any meds and come let him check her bp. She's so weak when these episodes occur, she can't even walk, so would really have trouble getting to the dr. Also, he wouldn't be there if after hours. I told her she should see someone else, but she said she would need a referral and her dr. already referred her to this guy so she'd just wait and hope she lives through it. Any suggestions?
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billh99 responded:
Ask the doctor what he is exactly what he is looking for.

She can get a home automatic BP machine for under $50.

And she can get a home EKG for about $200-$250 to capture the heart rhythm.

If it is frequent enough the doctor can get her an event recorder. They are used for 30-60 days.

If the episodes are less frequent there is an implantable loop recorder.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1920236-overview

http://www.medtronic.com/for-healthcare-professionals/products-therapies/cardiac-rhythm/cardiac-monitors-insert/reveal-dx-and-reveal-xt-insertable-cardiac-monitors-icms/index.htm
 
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"A friend of mine has been experiencing bouts of very high blood pressure."

The complex human body is usually able to keep blood pressure (BP) within safe/acceptable limits, but sometimes changes in lifestyle, health, side effects from prescription drugs, or changes in metabolism, make this difficult. This can cause the BP to become consistently higher or lower than normal, or just spike up and then drop down.

Compensatory mechanisms that control BP involves changing the diameter of veins and small arteries (arterioles), the amount of blood pumped out from the heart per minute (cardiac output), and the volume of blood in the vessels.

High BP, temporary or chronic, may/can be related to various heart disorders, kidney problems, and sometimes liver, or adrenal gland problems. One's susceptibility to develop it can even be caused by an imbalance somewhere within the body's precise regulating systems.

Normal resting BP in adults is under 120/80 with 115/75 or 110/70 considered as being optimal/ideal. Prehypertension is defined as systolic of 120-139 mmHg and diastolic of 80-89 mmHg. Stage 1 is systolic of 140-159 and diastolic of 90-99. Stage II is systolic of 160-179 and diastolic of 100-109. Stage III is systolic greater than 180 and diastolic greater than 110. Stage IV systolic of 210 and greater, and diastolic of 120 and greater.

Health dangers from blood pressure vary among different age groups and depending on whether systolic or diastolic pressure (or both) is elevated, and for how long.

Elevated blood pressure, isolated diastolic hypertension, isolated systolic hypertension and diastolic/systolic hypertension, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and renovascular disease.

High systolic blood pressure appears as a significant indicator for heart complications, including death, in all ages, but especially in middle-aged and older adults.

High diastolic pressure is a strong predictor of heart attack and brain attack in young adults and in those of any age with essential hypertension, high blood pressure from unknown causes, which occurs in the great majority of cases

Also, pulse pressure is important, This is the difference between systolic and diastolic. Usually, the resting (in sitting position) pulse pressure in healthy individuals is 40 mmHg, give or take a bit. A wide or narrow pulse pressure is not good.

"chest pain, and extreme weakness"

As applicable to the patient, of the various types/kinds of heart conditions, symptoms may/can be acute (occurring suddenly), be chronic (occurring over a long period of time), come and go (be transient, fleeting or episodic, such as an irregular heartbeat, requiring the use of a Holter monitor or event recorder at home and during daily activities) or even be silent.

Best of luck to your friend.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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Mayo Clinic

Get the most out of home blood pressure monitoring


http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/high-blood-pressure/HI00016

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WebMD

The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

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Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

http://www.heartsite.com

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