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    When to go in?
    avatar
    healthmuse posted:
    Six months ago, I was sitting at my computer and felt mild chest pain that, over the next few minutes, started getting more intense. I never felt any shortness of breath, but I did feel anxious and experienced mild sweating. I woke up my wife and said I think I need to be checked out. Off to the emergency room we went. By the time we got *into* the car to head over, all the symptoms had eased. Mid-way I had no symptoms at all. But I said, "The last thing I want is for my tombstone to say, "Felt better; turned around and went home." Some $2000 later (our share), the doctors confirmed by EKG and other tests that nothing at all had happened and that I experienced "transient pain," which I guess is a short hand for, "Heck if we know." I was pleased to know that it wasn't my heart. But it raises a big question. We took a pretty big financial hit for that event. A few more false alarms like that and it's pretty serious money.

    Don't get me wrong. Obviously my health and life are worth whatever I would spend, and I am THRILLED that the doctors were able to make the determination and send me home with peace of mind. But aren't there some additional clues about what to look for when experiencing chest pain than to just "go in" and pay for false events?

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    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    When to go in?

    It is always ultimately up to the patient to be his/her own best health advocate.

    ......"the doctors confirmed by EKG and other tests that nothing at all had happened and......

    What other diagnostic tests did you have? Chest X-ray? Ultrasound? Nuclear? CT? MRI?

    The examination and treatment that one receives at the ER is not intended as a substitute for complete "all-around" medical care by/from the patient's regularly seen doctor(s).
    [br>......"and felt mild chest pain that,......"
    [br>In general-only here, chest pain, stationary or radiating elsewhere, with or without accompanying symptoms, has various causes, cardiac and non-cardiac, which includes, but is not limited to, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and psychological/psychogenic (the so-called 'psychogenic' effect, that is, actually originating in the mind),
    [br>Also, of the various types/kinds of heart conditions, symptoms may/can be acute (occurring suddenly), be chronic (occurring over a long period of time), come and go (be transient, fleeting or episodic,) or even be silent.[br>

    Best of luck down the road of life.
    [br>Take care,[br>[br>CardioStar*[br>[br>WebMD member (since 8/99)[br>[br>-[br>[br>-[br>[br>Be well-informed

    MedlinePlus - Trusted Health Information for You[br>[br>Chest pain

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003079.htm [br>[br>Mayo Clinic[br>[br>Chest pain[br>[br>http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/chest-pain/DS00016 [br>[br>eMedicne Health[br>[br>Chest pain[br>[br>http://www.emedicinehealth.com/chest_pain/article_em.htm [br>[br>Non-cardiac chest pain [br>[br>Musculoskeletal-related[br>[br>The chest contains many muscles, bones, tendons, and cartilage and strains or sprains to any of these may/can can cause chest pain. Chest pain associated with musculoskeletal injury is typically sharp and confined to a specific area of the chest. [br>[br>The pain may/can be brought on by movement of the chest and/or arms into certain positions, and often is relieved by changing position. [br>[br>The pain may/can be triggered off by pushing on part of the chest and often become worse when taking a deep breath. Though the pain typically last only seconds, it may/can also persist for days or longer. [br>[br>If/when chest pain increases when you press your finger on the painful site, or if you can pinpoint the spot that hurts, it is most likely chest wall-related pain, which may/can be caused by strained muscles or ligaments or even by a fractured rib.[br>[br>-[br>[br>LEARN ABOUT the Heart


    WebMD[br>[br>The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

    http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart [br>[br>HeartSite

    Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images. [br>[br>http://www.heartsite.com [br>[br>-[br>[br>Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS.

    Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"
    [br>- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society[br>[br>.[br>[br>It's your future......be there. [br>[br>. .[br>[br>WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
    Hi:

    When to go in?

    It is always ultimately up to the patient to be his/her own best health advocate.

    ......"the doctors confirmed by EKG and other tests that nothing at all had happened and......

    What other diagnostic tests did you have? Chest X-ray? Ultrasound? Nuclear? CT? MRI?

    The examination and treatment that one receives at the ER is not intended as a substitute for complete "all-around" medical care by/from the patient's regularly seen doctor(s).

    ......"and felt mild chest pain that,......"

    In general-only here, chest pain, stationary or radiating elsewhere, with or without accompanying symptoms, has various causes, cardiac and non-cardiac, which includes, but is not limited to, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and psychological/psychogenic (the so-called 'psychogenic' effect, that is, actually originating in the mind),

    Also, of the various types/kinds of heart conditions, symptoms may/can be acute (occurring suddenly), be chronic (occurring over a long period of time), come and go (be transient, fleeting or episodic,) or even be silent.

    Best of luck down the road of life.


    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)

    -

    -

    Be well-informed

    MedlinePlus - Trusted Health Information for You

    Chest pain

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003079.htm

    Chest pain

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/chest-pain/DS00016 [br>

    eMedicne Health

    Chest pain

    http://www.emedicinehealth.com/chest_pain/article_em.htm

    Non-cardiac chest pain

    Musculoskeletal-related

    The chest contains many muscles, bones, tendons, and cartilage and strains or sprains to any of these may/can can cause chest pain. Chest pain associated with musculoskeletal injury is typically sharp and confined to a specific area of the chest.

    The pain may/can be brought on by movement of the chest and/or arms into certain positions, and often is relieved by changing position.

    The pain may/can be triggered off by pushing on part of the chest and often become worse when taking a deep breath. Though the pain typically last only seconds, it may/can also persist for days or longer.

    If/when chest pain increases when you press your finger on the painful site, or if you can pinpoint the spot that hurts, it is most likely chest wall-related pain, which may/can be caused by strained muscles or ligaments or even by a fractured rib.

    -

    LEARN ABOUT the Heart


    WebMD

    The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

    http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart


    HeartSite

    Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

    http://www.heartsite.com

    -

    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society[br>[br>.[br>

    .

    It's your future......be there.

    . .

    WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
     
    avatar
    healthmuse responded:
    Thanks for the responses.

    Some answers to a few asked questions.

    I'm not sure of all the tests that they did. There were quite a few, some at the beginning, including blood work, the EKG for 90 minutes or so, and other things. I felt like I was in very good hands.

    I've had this kind of thing happen at various times, and it's generally the intensity of the feeling and the duration that guides me as to whether to go in or not. To go in for every instance of chest pain would break the bank. Not to mention waste my time; not to mention waste the doctors' time, when they could be servicing people who actually did need their attention.

    I like the comment about having other symptoms, and that helps.

    I do get an annual checkup - pretty religiously, though it varies from 9 - 14 months depending on what's going on in my life. No one has suggested that I have more than an annual checkup, and I'm not sure what my insurance would allow in that regard.

    I guess I was hoping that maybe there were some clear-cut criteria that I had somehow missed.

    Thanks.
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to healthmuse's response:
    You're welcome.

    "I do get an annual checkup - pretty religiously......"

    Kudos on that.

    "I'm not sure of all the tests that they did. There were quite a few......

    Be sure to get a copy of your medical records and place it in a file (stored in a safe/secure place) for future reference.

    Remember, you know your body best.

    Take good care,

    CardioStar*

    -

    -

    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society[br>[br>.[br>

    .

    It's your future......be there.

    . .

    WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


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