Pulse Pressure?
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ccross13126 posted:
For the past 2 days my blood pressure readings have been in the 140's/80's or 130's/70's-80's. I've noticed my pulse pressure ranges from 40 to as high as 70. Is this normal for a 35 year old male? I keep reading that pulse pressure over 40 is bad and indicates stiffness in the arteries and aorta.
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"Is this normal for a 35 year old male?"

General info

Mayo Clinic

What is pulse pressure? How important is pulse pressure to your overall health?

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/pulse-pressure/AN00968


Additionally here, as reported, the complex human body is usually able to keep blood pressure (BP) within safe/acceptable limits, but sometimes changes in lifestyle, health, side effects from prescription drugs, or changes in metabolism, make this difficult. This can cause the BP to become consistently higher or lower than normal, or just spike up and then drop down.

Compensatory mechanisms that control BP involves changing the diameter of veins and small arteries (arterioles), the amount of blood pumped out from the heart per minute (cardiac output), and the volume of blood in the vessels.

High BP, temporary or chronic, may/can be related to various heart disorders, kidney problems, and sometimes liver, or adrenal gland problems. One's susceptibility to develop it can even be caused by an imbalance somewhere within the body's precise regulating systems.

Normal resting BP in adults is under 120/80 with 115/75 or 110/70 considered as being optimal/ideal. Prehypertension is defined as systolic of 120-139 mmHg and diastolic of 80-89 mmHg. Stage 1 is systolic of 140-159 and diastolic of 90-99. Stage II is systolic of 160-179 and diastolic of 100-109. Stage III is systolic greater than 180 and diastolic greater than 110. Stage IV systolic of 210 and greater, and diastolic of 120 and greater.

Health dangers from blood pressure vary among different age groups and depending on whether systolic or diastolic pressure (or both) is elevated, and for how long.

Elevated blood pressure, isolated diastolic hypertension, isolated systolic hypertension and diastolic/systolic hypertension, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and renovascular disease.

High systolic blood pressure appears as a significant indicator for heart complications, including death, in all ages, but especially in middle-aged and older adults.

High diastolic pressure is a strong predictor of heart attack and brain attack in young adults and in those of any age with essential hypertension, high blood pressure from unknown causes, which occurs in the great majority of cases

Pulse pressure is also important, This is the difference between systolic and diastolic. Usually, the resting (in sitting position) pulse pressure in healthy individuals is 40 mmHg, give or take a bit. A wide or narrow pulse pressure is not good.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

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