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Widow maker stent risks
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ShamanPepper posted:
I am a 38 yo female who had bypass surgery in Sept 2010 at age 36. Am now having my 4th cardic cath procedure to follow up on recent chest pain and shortness of breath. Was told that my orig bypass surgery was not sufficient in providing good blood flow to my heart so they put a stent where the blockage was-in the widow maker -to compensate for lack of blood flow. What are the possibilities that I will need to have a second bypass surgery to correct this problem if stent is compromised? Being my age and already having these types of issues what can I expect going forward?
Reply
 
avatar
cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"What are the possibilities that I will need to have a second bypass surgery to correct this problem if stent is compromised?"

"Being my age and already having these types of issues what can I expect going forward?"

The bottom line

Coronary stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting) are only a Band-aid or spot-treatment, and bypass surgery is only a clever way of temporarily circumventing the problem (atherosclerosis), as these procedures do not address the disease process and what drives the progression.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a lifelong unpredictable (may/can exhibit periods of stabilization, acceleration and even some regression) condition requiring a continuum of care.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

Cardiostar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

-

-

Be well-informed

The "widowmaker" gets its name due to its prognostic implications, where the left main splits into the LAD and LCX. This is a narrowing of the proximal (closest to the point of origin) portion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery.

If/when
a complete blockage (100% total occlusion) in this specific area in the LAD occurs, it is nicknamed "Widowmaker" because it is often lethal (fatal).

The most truest form of the "Widowmaker" or "Widowermaker", and absolute worst case scenario, is a total (100%) occlusion in the left main (LM) coronary artery (feeds massive left ventricular area), which is extremely rare and almost always invariably fatal.

-

WebMD

Living with Heart Disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD)

CAD is chronic disease with no cure. When you have CAD, it is important to take care of your......

This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or...

Recognize the symptoms......

Reduce your risk factors......

Take your medications......

See your doctor for regular check-ups......


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease

- -

The coronary arteries are classified as so-called 'end circulation' since they represent the only source of blood supply to the heart muscle.

Coronary artery anatomy

Starting with the left anterior descending (LAD), the most critical, next to the ultra-critical left main (LM).

http://www.heartsite.com/html/lad.html

_ . _

Heart-Healthy Foods

Nothing complicated, just plain and simple

AVOID
foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. CHOOSE skim or low-fat milk, low-fat yogurt and reduced-fat cheeses. Eat more fish and poultry. LIMIT servings to five to seven ounces a day. TRIM visible fat. Limit egg yolks. SUBSTITUTE two egg whites for one whole egg or use an egg-substitute. Eat more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, breads and cereals. USE LESS salt and fat. SEASON WITH herbs and spices rather than with sauces, gravies and butter

-

Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, typically affecting the carotid, coronary and peripheral arteries, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation) , diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes second and thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity"), high blood pressure (hypertension), Low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

-

Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.


It's your future......be there.

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
 
avatar
cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"What are the possibilities that I will need to have a second bypass surgery to correct this problem if stent is compromised?"

"Being my age and already having these types of issues what can I expect going forward?"

The bottom line

Coronary stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting) are only a Band-aid or spot-treatment, and bypass surgery is only a clever way of temporarily circumventing the problem (atherosclerosis), as these procedures do not address the disease process and what drives the progression.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a lifelong unpredictable (may/can exhibit periods of stabilization, acceleration and even some regression) condition requiring a continuum of care.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

Cardiostar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

-

-

Be well-informed

The "widowmaker" gets its name due to its prognostic implications, where the left main splits into the LAD and LCX. This is a narrowing of the proximal (closest to the point of origin) portion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery.

If/when
a complete blockage (100% total occlusion) in this specific area in the LAD occurs, it is nicknamed "Widowmaker" because it is often lethal (fatal).

The most truest form of the "Widowmaker" or "Widowermaker", and absolute worst case scenario, is a total (100%) occlusion in the left main (LM) coronary artery (feeds massive left ventricular area), which is extremely rare and almost always invariably fatal.

-

WebMD

Living with Heart Disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD)

CAD is chronic disease with no cure. When you have CAD, it is important to take care of your......

This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or...

Recognize the symptoms......

Reduce your risk factors......

Take your medications......

See your doctor for regular check-ups......


http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease

- -

The coronary arteries are classified as so-called 'end circulation' since they represent the only source of blood supply to the heart muscle.

Coronary artery anatomy

Starting with the left anterior descending (LAD), the most critical, next to the ultra-critical left main (LM).

http://www.heartsite.com/html/lad.html

_ . _

Heart-Healthy Foods

Nothing complicated, just plain and simple

AVOID
foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. CHOOSE skim or low-fat milk, low-fat yogurt and reduced-fat cheeses. Eat more fish and poultry. LIMIT servings to five to seven ounces a day. TRIM visible fat. Limit egg yolks. SUBSTITUTE two egg whites for one whole egg or use an egg-substitute. Eat more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, breads and cereals. USE LESS salt and fat. SEASON WITH herbs and spices rather than with sauces, gravies and butter

-

Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, typically affecting the carotid, coronary and peripheral arteries, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation) , diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes second and thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity"), high blood pressure (hypertension), Low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

-

Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.


It's your future......be there.

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
 
avatar
deadmanwalking57 responded:
Have you altered your diet, stress and lifestyle appropriate for heart disease ? If you do, in time, you may have no more chest pain, and be able to be as active as you wish.

More chest pain means worsening blockages. Its all in your own hands, and fork.
 
avatar
coolbeans51 responded:
Hi,


About 3.5 years ago I had 2 heart attacks within a weeks time, both caused by "the Widow Maker!" It got clogged that fast, and now its clogged again and the doctors are afraid to try to put in a third stent. My heart is at 12% of capacity and partially dead, a bypass would be difficult.
I am currently out of the hospital with my LAD still plugged up and wearing a thing called a "Life vest", not sure if will help, but I am hoping the Doctors will figure something out soon.
I am weak and tired feeling, but alive for now.
I was working last Friday10/24/14, and have Insurance, now not sure of ANYTHING.
 
avatar
cardiostarusa1 replied to coolbeans51's response:
Hi:

..."the doctors are afraid to try to put in a third stent."

"a bypass would be difficult."

The hospital/medical center you choose can make a difference...a critical difference. Choose wisely!

Credentials, Experience, Research

U.S. News & World Report

Best Hospitals: Heart & Heart Surgery

http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings/heart-and-heart-surgery

In general, if/when common procedures, first time/re-do, such as angioplasty, with or w/o stents, or coronary artery bypass graft surgery are not deemed feasible, as applicable to the patient, there may/can be other options, that includes non-invasive EECP, laser-based TMR and gene therapy/transfer.

FDA approved non-invasive Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP) treatments.

Are You a Candidate for EECP Therapy?

http://www.eecp.com

Surgical-based transmyocardial revascularization (TMR, FDA approved).

Holmium:YAG laser

http://www.cardiogenesis.com

Growing your own so-called "bio-bypass" (collateral vessels) around blockages in the heart, and in the legs
It's known as gene therapy/gene transfer, which has been in experimental phases for quite some time now.
.
As reported, over the last 20 years, gene therapy has moved from pre-clinical animal investigations (animal models) to human clinical studies for many diseases ranging from single gene disorders, to much more complex, multi-factorial, multi-conditional diseases such as dreaded cancer and cardiovascular disorders.

Readers Digest Online - February 2008

An experimental treatment is giving desperately ill heart patients a new lease on life.

A process called angiogenesis. The experimental procedure had shown great promise in two German studies, and the FDA had approved the launch of the first American clinical trial.

The technique involves injecting the heart with a protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1).

"The protein is like a seed that causes new vessels to sprout, creating a network of capillaries and small arteries."
FGF-1 occurs naturally in the body.

http://www.readersdigest.com.au/heart-hope

"My heart is at 12% of capacity"

% factor

Some individuals who have a low/really low LVEF feel fine and function well, while others do not.

Understanding Your Ejection Fraction

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/heartfailure/ejectionfraction.aspx


**
To get a decent estimate of LVEF, a MUGA scan is reported as being the most accurate of the non-invasive imaging.

About.com article excerpt

When is the MUGA scan more useful than other heart tests?

The advantages of the MUGA scan over other techniques (such as the echocardiogram) for measuring the LVEF are twofold
. First, the MUGA ejection fraction is highly accurate, probably more accurate than that obtained by any other technique. Second, The MUGA ejection fraction is highly reproducible. That is, if the LVEF measurement is repeated several times, nearly the same answer is always obtained. (With other tests, variations in the measured LVEF are much greater.)

.

Additionally here, as applicable to the patient, in some cases, along with a doctor recommended/authorized exercise regimen (unless contraindicated), LVEF can be increased, sometimes substantially, by customizing/tweaking experimental and established prescription drug-therapy (e.g., Coreg, which showed, back in its clinical trial days, that it could boost LVEF in some individuals) and supplemental (complimentary or integrative medicine) therapy, as deemed applicable.

Just one example of complimentary medicine is the use of the supplement Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone, a vitamin-like substance) for heart failure (though currently not scientifically proven, some doctors may advise the patient to give it a try) which may/can (i.e., along with doctor directed prescription drug-therapy, and with the doctor knowing about any supplements being taken) help to improve LVEF in some, with other supplements sometimes added to the mix.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*



 
avatar
deadmanwalking57 responded:
ShamanPepper:

No one can predict the future. If my cardiologist were right about me, I would have died 6 years ago. I defied the odds by being extremely pro-active to learn everything I could about our disease, beneficial foods, careful methodical exercise rehab. And by doing everything he told me to do. He suggested four supplements, besides a few prescribed medications, and I am a near ideal patient to rarely ever miss a dose of any of them. Most people are not so good about their meds. Be one who does.

We are not all cookie-cutter critters. That is one reason it is called "practicing medicine". Doctors learn and do their best for us, but it is nearly impossible to keep up with all continuing research. And they don't. They can't. But they give us the best information they can from their years of education and medical practice.

Check my story here, fact checked and edited by WebMD.
http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/features/webmd-the-magazines-my-story-cardiac-recovery .

Do your best for yourself. No one else can. Your doctor is giving you his best. Give yours, too.

DMW


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