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bcampbell10000 posted:
Hospitalized on 1/23 for severe edema. With all the symptoms: edema, sob, fatigue, exercise intolerance,hypertension, etc., My doctor said one side of the heart is stiff and will not fill with enough blood. There are two valves not working correctly and the aortic artery is enlarged. Doctors on another site gave it a name, diastolic heart failure. They also said there really aren't any meds at this time for this condition. But WebMD shows a whole list of them. Are these meds just to make you feel better? Or can they slow the progression?
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James Beckerman, MD, FACC responded:
These are great questions.

Even though about half of people with a diagnosis of congestive heart failure have diastolic heart failure (as opposed to systolic heart failure which represents decreased squeezing function of the heart), we have far fewer evidence-based drug therapies to offer.

For systolic CHF, we have many medications which may be associated with reduced symptoms, improvement in function, and longer lives.

For diastolic CHF, diuretics are often helpful to reduce shortness of breath. There are other medications which are sometimes used, but the evidence to support their use is much less robust.


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