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Sudden arrhythmia, or is it?
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Mr_Angry posted:
I was at a leadership offsite for my job and I admit there were two dinners where alcohol (red and white wine) were consumed in large quantities, myself included. After the first night of wine I went to bed around 1 AM (we had long work days at this offsite, generally from 9 AM to midnight with breaks for lunch and dinner) and the next morning I woke up with terrible pain in my chest and a feeling of my heart skipping beats and racing to catch up.

I am a 37 year old male who was diagnosed with GERD when I was 28. While I'm a non-smoker I've made several lifestyle changes in the past ten years, losing nearly 50 pounds and no longer eating late at night. For the most part I'm very healthy; I work out three times a week and walk everywhere so I get plenty of activities.

When this sudden pain occurred I figured it was due to acid reflux but after a day of this pain and this "flip-flop" feeling in my heart where it would feel like a sudden contraction and bout of light-headedness I went to my local physician who listened to my heart and did an EKG and found everything normal. I was worried because my father had his heart attack at 52 and there is a history of hypertension and high cholesterol in my family but my doctor told me there were no indications that I was having any type of heart attack.

I've read some about premature ventricular complexes (PVC's) and how they could be brought on by stress or GERD and such--does this sound like the case? I've taken my blood pressure and it appears normal (average resting pulse of 72 and pressure of 125/73) but I've never had this "flip-flop" feeling in my heart before. I'm probably just over anxious about it which is just contributing to it and again I have a normal EKG and heart reading but with my family history I'd just like to make sure.

How long after a massive acid-reflux attack would this feeling continue? I no longer have the burning chest pain associated with acid reflux but could these PVC like symptoms continue on for a few more days? So far it has not affected my lifestyle, I worked out at the gym yesterday including cardio without issue but these sudden feelings of my heart going thump are disconcerting and I just want to make sure I'm not ignoring something larger.

Thank you.
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

......"and a feeling of my heart skipping beats"

"I figured it was due to acid reflux but after a day of this pain and this flip-flop feeling in my heart where it would feel like a sudden contraction and bout of lightheadedness"

"I've read some about premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) and how they could be brought on by stress or GERD and such."

The most common type of palpitations, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs, occurs even in many heart-healthy individuals), is described that the heart is flip-flopping, fluttering, jumping, pausing or stopping briefly (though it's actually not doing that), pounding, skipping, thumping, or strong, hard, or forceful beats being felt in the chest, neck, throat, and has various causes (cardiac and non-cardiac) or triggers (includes stress, even at the subconscious level (affecting the subconscious mind).

Some individuals have reported, palpitations (PACs, PVCs), being triggered off by GERD/acid reflux/heartburn, swallowing (food or drink), gas, bloating, belching, burping, or coughing, or after a heavy meal/on a full stomach.

These are known as indirect causes or an "reactive-arrhythmia". This may/can also be a side effect of some foods (which includes additives and preservatives), drinks, or drugs. On the flip side, in some cases, belching, burping, or coughing may/can terminate/relieve an irregular heartbeat/arrhythmia.

PVCs are typically harmless, however, the main problem or concern (even more so, much more emphasized for those with certain major or serious heart conditions) with PVCs is when sustained ventricular tachycardia (runs of PVCs over 30 seconds) occurs.

Symptoms that may/can occur wih PVCs includes none at all or chest pain/discomfort/pressure/tightness, shortness of breath, lightheadedness/dizziness, and in uncommon to rare cases, near-syncope or syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, includes fainting and passing out).

Best of luck down the road of life. Live long and prosper.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

-

-

Be well-informed

MedicineNet - We Bring Doctors' Knowledge to You

Palpitations

http://www.medicinenet.com/Palpitations/article.htm

eHealthMD

Palpitations

http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/palpitations/PAL_whatis.html


Learn about the heart's delicate and precise electrical conduction system

Animated Tutorial

http://www.your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/conductiontutorial.html

Heart Rhythm Society

Patient and Public Information Center

http://www.hrspatients.org/patients


- -

WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men and Women

Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

Heart Disease SYMPTOMS

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

Mayo Clinic

Heart Disease

Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affects your heart and sometimes the blood vessels......

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

-

LEARN ABOUT the Heart


WebMD

The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart


-

HeartSite

Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, diagnostic images

http://www.heartsite.com

-

Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR questions and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who and ASK the mostQUESTIONS, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there. .

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical , diagnosis or treatment.

NEVER delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on WebMD.

IF YOU have a medical emergency CALL 911
 
avatar
cardiostarusa1 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Hi:

......"and a feeling of my heart skipping beats"

"I figured it was due to acid reflux but after a day of this pain and this flip-flop feeling in my heart where it would feel like a sudden contraction and bout of lightheadedness"

"I've read some about premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) and how they could be brought on by stress or GERD and such."

The most common type of palpitations, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs, occurs even in many heart-healthy individuals), is described that the heart is flip-flopping, fluttering, jumping, pausing or stopping briefly (though it's actually not doing that), pounding, skipping, thumping, or strong, hard, or forceful beats being felt in the chest, neck, throat, and has various causes (cardiac and non-cardiac) or triggers (includes stress, even at the subconscious level (affecting the subconscious mind).

Some individuals have reported, palpitations (PACs, PVCs), being triggered off by GERD/acid reflux/heartburn, swallowing (food or drink), gas, bloating, belching, burping, or coughing, or after a heavy meal/on a full stomach.

These are known as indirect causes or an "reactive-arrhythmia". This may/can also be a side effect of some foods (which includes additives and preservatives), drinks, or drugs. On the flip side, in some cases, belching, burping, or coughing may/can terminate/relieve an irregular heartbeat/arrhythmia.

PVCs are typically harmless, however, the main problem or concern (even more so, much more emphasized for those with certain major or serious heart conditions) with PVCs is when sustained ventricular tachycardia (runs of PVCs over 30 seconds) occurs.

Symptoms that may/can occur wih PVCs includes none at all or chest pain/discomfort/pressure/tightness, shortness of breath, lightheadedness/dizziness, and in uncommon to rare cases, near-syncope or syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, includes fainting and passing out).

Best of luck down the road of life. Live long and prosper.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

-

-

Be well-informed

MedicineNet - We Bring Doctors' Knowledge to You

Palpitations

http://www.medicinenet.com/Palpitations/article.htm

eHealthMD

Palpitations

http://www.ehealthmd.com/library/palpitations/PAL_whatis.html


Learn about the heart's delicate and precise electrical conduction system

Animated Tutorial

http://www.your-doctor.com/healthinfocenter/medical-conditions/cardiovascular/conductiontutorial.html

Heart Rhythm Society

Patient and Public Information Center

http://www.hrspatients.org/patients


- -

WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men and Women

Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

Heart Disease SYMPTOMS

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms

Mayo Clinic

Heart Disease

Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affects your heart and sometimes the blood vessels......

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120

-

LEARN ABOUT the Heart


WebMD

The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart


-

HeartSite

Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, diagnostic images

http://www.heartsite.com

-

Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR questions and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who and ASK the mostQUESTIONS, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there. .

. .

WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical , diagnosis or treatment.

NEVER delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on WebMD.

IF YOU have a medical emergency CALL 911
 
avatar
deke44 responded:
Possibly atrial fibrillation. I wore a monitor for a month 3 times over a span of 4 years. As luck would have it I never had an incident with the monitor being worn at the time. The fourth time i had an incident I went back to my cardiologist and once again the monitor was issued. While playing golf on Nov 4 a few years ago I had an afib incident I quickly hooked up the monitor, all I had to do was plug in the wires and recorded the incidences all the way up the 15th hole. Quit playing told the guys I had to go, kept recording all the way home 4 miles or so, shortly before reaching home my heart beat returned to normal. I called the number on the monitor and sent the afib recording through the phone. The recorder asked how I was feeling now. I told him things were back to normal. He said erase the tape and ler's record your heart rhytm now that it is back to normal so we can compare the two sets. Within 2 hours I got a call from my cardiologist who quickly inforned me that this was not an emergency call, but we now know that it is Afib, nothing to worry about, we have effective medication that can control it. In our meeting he said though you will not have the afib sensation you still have a fib it's just the sensation that is controlled.


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