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double bypass open heart surgery and recovery.
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An_251526 posted:
Before 2002, not having a very physically tiring job I came home after work very tired. A friend induced me to have a stress test. I failed and was told I had 2 blockages, I forget the percentages of the blockages. At the time I was 69 years old. I had the open heart surgery on a Thursday and went home on Sunday. Thursday I was completely out of it. Friday at 4 PM a nurse asked if I would like to get out of bed and sit for awhile. I agreed. I might add that I never asked for painkiller pinches even though some of the nurses said there was no need for me to suffer pain. I replied the pain was bearable. After sitting up in a chair for a half hour the nurse asked if I would like to go for a walk. I assented. We walked 15 or 20 steps from my bed and back. She said "had enough?" I said I thought we were going for a walk, heck I walked farther down the church aisle to marry. We walked the full length of the hallway and back. She said that is enough for today and I bowed to her expertise. Early Sat. morning my nurse and I traversed the hallway a couple of times. On Saturday My wife and 4 daughters, all of whom waited all day the day of the operation in the waiting room and were there all of Fri, all came and my wife said her brother and his wife were coming from some distance away to visit me that noon. I told my family (knowing they must have a measure of exhaustion) I was accepting no visitors, including my immediate family. They were all to leave now. All I want to do today is rest. My wife left after I threathened to have her escorted out. On a Sunday while taking my walk with my nurse a man, I did not know, had never seen nor ever spoken to walked pass me and a few steps later asked when I had been operated on, the nurse helped me swing around to face him and I told him Thursday. He then asked my name. When I told him my name he told the nurse, "I have heard enough about him. Call his home contact and tell them to come and get him.
I was religious about following their instructions with the exception of me doing more than they told me to do. I went to therapy 3 times a week where I was constantly being told to back it off. Within 5 weeks I was walking 3.6 miles a day and doing it in 51 minutes. A regimen I kept up for 6 years until I started having pain in my left knee. My orthopedist, knowing my life style said you do have some knee damage. Here are your options, if you keep pounding the pavement the damage to your knee will worsen exponentially and you may have to have knee surgery. "And that is not a pleasant recovery" or being 75 and as active as you are you need not pound the pavement, you can walk a little less of a track or treadmill that has swome give to it. I said I have walked on a track and a treadmill and they are the most boring of endeavors. What you really are saying is to stop pounding the pavement, do what daily activities i normally do with the exception of pounding the pavement and I might die before I need a knee operation. Yes, he said that is it in a nutshell. I am now pushing 80, I don't pound the pavement daily. but I do cut down trees on occasion, I swing an axe, or sledgehammer when necessary, I moe the lawn walking though I have a riding mower. And I have developed the attitude of "what will be, will be".
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"I am now pushing 80"

Bless you. May you live to be 100-plus.

"what will be, will be".

Gets me to think about that classic song from Doris Day.

*Lyrics excerpt*

Que sera sera,
What ever will be, will be,
The future's not ours to see,
Que sera sera

.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)
 
avatar
cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"I am now pushing 80"

Bless you. May you live to be 100-plus.

"what will be, will be".

Gets me to think about that classic song from Doris Day.

*Lyrics excerpt*

Que sera sera,
What ever will be, will be,
The future's not ours to see,
Que sera sera

.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)


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