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Women and CAD
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MarcoPaula posted:
I am a 61 year old female just diagnosed with CAD and recently had a stent placed in one of my major arteries. I was pretty symptom-free although past several weeks pretty tired and getting a bit breathless walking up hills. This has been a huge shock to me as I watch my diet pretty well, exercise regularly, eat healthy for the most part, and am at healthy weight. My doctors say it is probably due to genetics. I had been on 20 ml lipitor and now on 80 plus aspirin, blood thinner and metopilol for HBP. I also have SVT which seems to have calmed down since procedure. I am looking for reassurance that i am going to be ok!! This was pretty scary. I had a blood clot in the first stint that was put in and 20 minutes later went into cardiac arrest and stent had to be added to. My husband thought I was a goner! So I'm a bit worried but doing better every day. Today is 6 days out and went shopping and did ok. Any reassurances or support welcome. Advice too. We are following mediterrean diet and having red wine with dinner! No more french fries for me!! Thx
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

You've been through cardiac arrest, so hopefully all will go as well as possible from now on.

The bottom line

Coronary stents (bare-metal or drug-eluting) are only a Band-aid or spot-treatment as it does not address the disease process and what drives the progression.

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a lifelong unpredictable (may/can exhibit periods of stabilization, acceleration and even some regression) condition requiring a continuum of care

Keep ALL known modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (which actually begins very early in life, even as early as in the pre-teen/teenage years) closely in-check.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

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Be well-informed

As reported, a risk factor merely increases the probability that one will develop cardiovascular disease, BUT doesn't 100% guarantee that one will develop it, nor does its absence (or even the absence of ALL known risk factors) 100% guarantee that one won't have a heart attack or brain attack.


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WebMD

Living with Heart Disease

Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)


CAD is a chronic disease with no cure. When you have coronary artery disease, it is important to take......

This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or surgery to improve blood flow to the heart....../It is up to you to take steps...

Recognize the symptoms......

Reduce your risk factors......

Take your medications......

See your doctor for regular check-ups......

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease

Coronary artery anatomy

Starting with the left anterior descending (LAD), the most critical, next to the ultra-critical left main (LM).

http://www.heartsite.com/html/lad.html

_ . _

Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack/stroke

Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation) , diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes second/thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity"), high blood pressure (hypertension), Low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).


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Typically, cardiac rehab plays an important role in the overall recovery process, which is different for everyone, and at any age.

WebMD

Cardiac Rehab

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/tc/cardiac-rehabilitation-topic-overview

Mayo Clinic

Cardiac rehab: Building a better life after heart disease

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cardiac-rehabilitation/HB00017

Mended Hearts

Hope for recovery. Hope for a rich, full life.

For more than 50 years, Mended Hearts has been offering the gift of hope and encouragement to heart patients, their families and caregivers.

http://www.mendedhearts.org


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WebMD

KNOW your prescription drugs and KNOW them WELL

Drugs A-Z

http://www.webmd.com/drugs/index-drugs.aspx

Ask A Patient

Rate a drug, side effects, comments, etc.

http://askapatient.com/rateyourmedicine.htm


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Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

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It's your future......be there.



WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
 
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billh99 responded:
Are you back to exercising? Probably just walking right now?

If you have any concerns about returning to exercise talk to your doctor about going to a cardiac rehab program.


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