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    Multifocal atrial tachycardia
    avatar
    theinzanas posted:
    I recently had an ablation done for some issues I was having with SVT. My cardiologist originally thought is was a standard AVNRT and the ablation would solve my issues. The ablation went as well as possible but it turned out I did not have AVRT but Multifocal atrial tachycardia. The electrophysiologist ablated the spots and felt it was sucessful. Here's where things get strange...after the 6 hrs of laying flat I got up to ggo to the restroom and felt very winded and had a slight burning feeling in my chest as if I was catching a cold. As the next day progressed they kept and then started having a sharp pain in the right side of my chest. After visits from numerous doctors is was decided to have a CAT scan. Wati for it....the CAT scan revealed a bilateral pulmonary embolism!!!! WHAT, needless to say that was scary. On the mend now but the question is what came first the chicken or the egg, did I have the clots prior to the procedure or where the clots caused by the procedure. Most doctors are aligning with clots were there prior to procedure because the type of SVT I had is common in people with PE's. However I don't remember having breathing issues and had no pain until after the procedure. Had anyone else had this happen to them? Have you gotten a PE after an ablation. Need answers because I really don't want to be on blood thinners for life. Thanks for your help!!
    Reply
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    "What came first / did I have the clots prior to the procedure or where the clots caused by the procedure?"

    There's no way to truly tell/know for sure here.

    In mentioning AVRT, even though you did not have it -
    .
    Randomly-selected site info

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism after radiofrequency catheter ablation: A rare complication after a common procedure

    Abstract

    A 41-year-old man received an electrophysiological study (EPS) and radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) for atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT) in our hospital. Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) with hypotension developed 9 hours after these procedures......

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1726490112001372

    Best of luck down the road of life.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)

    -

    -

    It's your future......be there.

    .

    WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
     
    avatar
    theinzanas replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
    Thank you this is most helpful. While 2 of my doctors are leaning toward PE prior to ablation with no known cause my pulmonologist is leaning towards having PE prior to ablation but may have been "provoked" thereby not requiring a lifetime of blood thinners. My 3 months on xarelto will come in July and it will be at that time I will have to decide to continue or not. I will not worry until July but it is a looming thought!
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to theinzanas's response:
    You're welcome.

    Take good care,

    CardioStar*
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
    P.S.

    While obviously no one wants to be on an anticoagulant (so-called "blood thinner"), at least with Xarelto, as reported, there are no routine coagulation monitoring tests necessary and no dietary restrictions.

    CardioStar*


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