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    Sudden Jump in BP
    avatar
    An_253132 posted:
    Spike in BP??. 66 yr. old non-smoker. Heart attack in 1994 = 1 stent, Heart attack in 2004 = 2 stents (all stents still in place) Walks 40 minutes four times a week, weight 203, Ht. 5'11". Stress test okay in Feb 2013. On Losartan 50 mg & Toprol 50mg for HBP and it has been under control. All of a sudden BP jumps to 204/104 and is staying in that area and is accompanied by low grade headache.. Dr. doubles dosage of both and no downward movement yet. Double dose of Losartan has been for a week, double of Toprol for just 3 days. It seems that is treating the symptoms but not the cause, What would be the cause of the 50/20 point jump in BP?

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    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    "What would be the cause of the 50/20 point jump in BP?"

    All one could do here is guess or speculate.

    The basics about blood pressure

    As reported, the complex human body is usually able to keep blood pressure (BP) within safe/acceptable limits, but sometimes changes in lifestyle, health, side effects from prescription drugs, or changes in metabolism, make this difficult. This can cause the BP to become consistently higher or lower than normal, or just spike up and then drop down.

    Compensatory mechanisms that control BP involves changing the diameter of veins and small arteries (arterioles), the amount of blood pumped out from the heart per minute (cardiac output), and the volume of blood in the vessels.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



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    Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack and brain attack


    Epidemiologic studies (EDS) have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation) , diabetes (considered as being the highest risk factor), smoking (includes second/thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity"), high blood pressure (hypertension), Low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

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    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society


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