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heart bypass after effects
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jimsaturday posted:
I JUST HAS 6 BYPASSES 2 MONTHS AGO AND MY DOCTOR IS RECOMMENDING AN IMPLANTED DEFIBULATOR. HOW COMMON IS THIS? I ALSO AM STILL CONSIDERED IN HEART FAILURE WITH 35% FLOW. CAN THIS BE INCREASED? HOW COMMON IS INSOMNIA AFTER BYPASS SURGERY
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

Who needs an ICD?

An ICD may be recommended for people who:.....

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/services/tests/procedures/icd.aspx

It is often said that an implantable cardiodefibrillator (ICD) is like having a rescue squad inside your chest. As demonstrated in clinical studies (patients meeting the current criteria), in some cases, those with a low (moderate) or very low (severe) left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), an ICD can improve the outcome (especially if the heart's electrical system goes haywire).

Some individuals who have a low (moderate) or a really low (severe) LVEF feel fine and function well, while others do not. It is important to know/keep track of the LVEF, the single-most important clinical indicator of heart function, how well the heart is pumping.

Understanding Your Ejection Fraction

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/heartfailure/ejectionfraction.aspx


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To get a decent estimate of LVEF, a MUGA scan is reported as being the most accurate of the non-invasive imaging.

Pertinent excerpt from an about.com article by Richard N. Fogoros, M.D.

When is the MUGA scan more useful than other heart tests?

The advantages of the MUGA scan over other techniques (such as the echocardiogram) for measuring the LVEF are twofold
. First, the MUGA ejection fraction is highly accurate, probably more accurate than that obtained by any other technique. Second, The MUGA ejection fraction is highly reproducible. That is, if the LVEF measurement is repeated several times, nearly the same answer is always obtained. (With other tests, variations in the measured LVEF are much greater.)

.

As applicable, in some cases, along with a doctor recommended/authorized exercise regimen (unless contraindicated), LVEF can be increased, sometimes substantially, by customizing/tweaking prescription drug-therapy (e.g., Coreg, which showed, back in its clinical trial days, that it could boost LVEF in some individuals) and supplemental (complimentary or integrative medicine) therapy, as deemed applicable.

Just one example of complimentary medicine is the use of the supplement Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone, a vitamin-like substance) for heart failure (though currently not scientifically proven, some doctors may advise the patient to give it a try) which may/can (i.e., along with doctor directed prescription drug-therapy, and with the doctor knowing about any supplements being taken) help to improve LVEF in some, with other supplements sometimes added to the mix.

Heart Surgery Recovery - Tips to Help You Sleep

Many people complain of having trouble sleeping for some time after heart surgery. You may experience insomnia (an inability to sleep) because of:

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/ohs_sleep.aspx


Most important, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is only a clever way of temporarily circumventing the problem (atherosclerosis), as it doesn't treat the disease process and what drives the progression.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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Good to know, for the primary/secondary prevention of heart attack/brain attack

Epidemiologic studies have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction or mutation) , diabetes (the highest risk factor), smoking (includes second/thirdhand), inactivity, obesity (a global epidemic, "globesity"), hypertension, low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

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"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society
 
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jimsaturday replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
How much does an ICD limit activity- i really don't want one unless it is necessary
 
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billh99 replied to jimsaturday's response:
For the short term the activity limitations are arm motion such as tennis and swimming until the pocket where the ICD is placed to heal over.

Long term the main limitations are things like contact sports where the ICD might be hit.

There are fairly low, but real risk of infection and other problems from implanting the ICD.

The long term risk is from shocks that are not needed.

Here are some links to a blog by an EP. That is a cardiologist sub-specialist that do ICD's, pacemakers, and other conditions with heart rhythm problems.

http://www.drjohnm.org/2013/04/trying-to-understand-icds/
http://www.drjohnm.org/2012/06/new-trials-and-fibrillations-post-icd-decison-making-whose-decision-is-it/
http://www.drjohnm.org/2013/04/new-post-up-at-theheart-org-the-ethics-of-icd-decision-making/


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