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All the symptoms of heart disease
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Chrishen92 posted:
My friend has had symptoms of heart disease for over a year and she was just here at my house and I am very worried about her. Her doctor doesn't take it seriously at all. Hasn't even run tests on her heart.

She has shortness of breathe, swollen all over always, bloated stomach, dizzy, nauseous, high blood pressure, spiked heart beats, irregular heartbeats, tingling in her extremities (may be just from all the swelling)and the list goes on and on and even pain in her chest! She has a long family history of heart disease. Her father died of a heart attack. She is 55.

I finally have convinced her to see a cardiologist but that could take forever to get to. I don't think she should report to the E.R. either because she is not having a heart attack. I have looked all over the Internet and can only find information on heart disease or heart attacks but nothing that just gives some advice on what to do when it is not an attack.

Hopefully, someone will be able to help me help her.

Thank you on advance.
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cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"Her doctor doesn't take it seriously at all. Hasn't even run tests on her heart."

That's obviously not good.

"I finally have convinced her to see a cardiologist"

Kudos on that.

"I don't think she should report to the E.R. either because she is not having a heart attack."

Be that as it may, the extremely concerning symptoms you described that she has (no matter how long of a period of time it has been occurring) may/could be congestive heart failure or worse.

Hope she can get in to see a cardiologist ASAP or at least be evaluated at the ER for now.

Best of luck to your friend.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)



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WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men and Women

Acquired in life or congenital (born with it)

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men

Heart Disease SYMPTOMS

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/heart-disease-symptoms


LEARN ABOUT the Heart


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The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart


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Heart info, cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

http://www.heartsite.com


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Chrishen92 responded:
Thank you. You said the words I was most wanting to hear. Go to the ER for an evaluation....is that something that happens at the ER normally? I was hoping that the ER had something that helped her because she won't get in to a cardiologist for a long time. So, just to clarify. It is recommended that she go to the ER for an evaluation just in case she is in an immediate risk stage.
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to Chrishen92's response:
You're welcome.

....."is that something that happens at the ER normally?


Yes.

"It is recommended that she go to the ER for an evaluation just in case she is in an immediate risk stage."

The general consensus would be yes.

Take good care,

CardioStar*

 
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Chrishen92 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Thank you. She went the next day. The dr told her that her protein was low and that may be why she is retaining fluids. He said to eat more chicken and other proteins. I have not heard of that before. She may have slight COPD from smoking 20 years ago. She is doing a stress test next week.
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to Chrishen92's response:
You're welcome and thanks for the update.

"She is doing a stress test next week."

Hopefully a nuclear (**isotope, radioisotope) one with Cardiolite or Myoview.

HeartSite

Heart info, **cardiac tests (commonly performed, mainstream types) info, actual diagnostic images.

http://www.heartsite.com


Hope all goes as well as possible for your friend.

Take good care,

CardioStar*


 
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Chrishen92 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Awesome. Thanks. She still hasn't had her stress test. I thought it was scheduled.

Just another question. My sister in law is 43 and is in great shape but has struggled with extreme high blood pressure. Lots of theories on what's the cause through the years but nothing is fixing it. High!

She was in the hospital for 3 days last week and I went to see her at home and she was saying that her hips hurt and down her legs. Achy. I asked what the dr said and she said they didn't know. So they sent her home. She just learned to not be worried about stuff.

So frustrating. I don't want to abuse your ears by asking you questions about everyone I know but I am healthy and just don't think unhealthy is normal.

My family sees Dr. Kendal Stewart in Austin, TX at the NeuroSensory Center. My kids both had concussions that they had a hard time recovering from. They went from missing a semester of school to my son receiving an academic scholarship and my daughter is going to school and working like a normal teenage girl. Anyway, I just am pleased with his care. He has seminars on YouTube as well.

Thank you if you answer these questions.
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to Chrishen92's response:
......"but has struggled with extreme high blood pressure. Lots of theories on what's the cause through the years but nothing is fixing it. High!"

The complex human body is usually able to keep blood pressure (BP) within safe/acceptable limits, but sometimes changes in lifestyle, health, side effects from prescription drugs, or changes in metabolism, make this difficult. This can cause the BP to become consistently higher or lower than normal, or spike up and then drop down.

Compensatory mechanisms that control BP involves changing the diameter of veins and small arteries (arterioles), the amount of blood pumped out from the heart per minute (cardiac output), and the volume of blood in the vessels.

High BP, temporary or chronic, may/can be related to various heart disorders, kidney problems, and sometimes liver, or adrenal gland problems. One's susceptibility to develop it can even be caused by an imbalance somewhere within the body's precise regulating systems.

Normal resting BP in adults is under 120/80 with 115/75 or 110/70 considered as being optimal/ideal. Prehypertension is defined as systolic of 120-139 mmHg and diastolic of 80-89 mmHg. Stage 1 is systolic of 140-159 and diastolic of 90-99. Stage II is systolic of 160-179 and diastolic of 100-109. Stage III is systolic greater than 180 and diastolic greater than 110. Stage IV systolic of 210 and greater, and diastolic of 120 and greater.

Health dangers from blood pressure vary among different age groups and depending on whether systolic or diastolic pressure (or both) is elevated, and for how long.

Elevated blood pressure, isolated diastolic hypertension, isolated systolic hypertension and diastolic/systolic hypertension, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and renovascular disease.

High systolic blood pressure appears as a significant indicator for heart complications, including death, in all ages, but especially in middle-aged and older adults.

High diastolic pressure is a strong predictor of heart attack and brain attack in young adults and in those of any age with essential hypertension, high blood pressure from unknown causes, which occurs in the great majority of cases.

Also, pulse pressure is important, the difference between systolic and diastolic. Usually, the resting (in sitting position) pulse pressure in healthy individuals is 40 mmHg, give or take a bit. A consistently narrow (say 20-25 or less) or consistently wide (say 60-65 or more) pulse pressure is not good.

"She was in the hospital for 3 days last week"

Why was that?

"She was saying that her hips hurt and down her legs. Achy."

This has various causes.

Randomly-selected site for general info

http://www.physicalmedicineandrehab.com/hip-pain-traveling-down-leg


Best of luck to your sister-in-law.

CardioStar*




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Be well-informed

L@@K Back in the Media

As applicable to the patient

U.S. News & World Report

Health Brief

Explaining hypertension

Why you might have high blood pressure

(Pertinent Snippets)

Blood carries many hormones that regulate hunger, growth, and other activities. One of these is aldosterone, a hormone secreted by the adrenal gland that, among other things, tells the body to.../Sometimes the adrenal gland goes wonky and puts out too much aldosterone, causing....

What's important:

This study suggests a possible cause for hypertension in people with no obvious cause.

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/health/briefs/heart/hb040917a.htm


 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Additionally:

Regarding the "achy" hips/legs, do you know what prescription drugs she's currently taking, such as a cholesterol-lowering statin (may/can cause, in some individuals, muscle aches or pain in the back, hips and or legs) or other?
 
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Chrishen92 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
Thank you for your response. She was in the hospital to try to get her blood pressure back down. It was 185/135 but has been higher in the past. She does take bp medicine but the most recent takes her down way too low and she gets sick. Other ones will work for a while. Others have bad side effects. I could ask her which ones if that is of interest to you.

Growing up she was an athlete. Competed in gymnastics and now her daughters are all gymnasts and you the youngest is a track star. They are all very healthy. So this is so crazy.

The doctors have considered adrenal glands and her kidneys. Considered surgeries. Talked about her arteries/veins being spastic. Nothing is ever done about them so I assume they rules these things out.

Yes her leg pain could most definitely be in response to her medications.

Thank you.
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to Chrishen92's response:
You're welcome.

......"but the most recent takes her down way too low and she gets sick. Other ones will work for a while. Others have bad side effects."

For future reference:

It is said that medicine is a science of uncertainty and an act of probability, and for many, prescription drug-therapy is a hit or miss, trial and error affair.


Side effects/adverse reactions can not be predicted or pre-determined. If/when side effects occur, this may/can diminish or disappear as the body adjusts itself to the drug, though sometimes, one will simply not be able to tolerate a certain drug (or drugs) at all, at any dose.

Factors and conditions such as age height, weight, gender, genetics and metabolism may/can come into play in determining who experiences side effects and who does not.

Pharmacogenomics, the study of the interplay between genes and drugs, helps to explain why prescription drugs have different effects in different individuals. Genetic variation in one or more genes may be the basis for a therapeutic failure or for an adverse drug reaction.

Without lowering the dosage (unless applicable), sometimes, taking a particular prescription drug at a different time of the day or taking it with food may/can improve the side effect-related situation.

Sometimes, changing to another same-class drug or taking a lower dose of the drug along with another class of drug (for a combo-action) may/can improve the side effect-related situation.

About.com

Alternative Medicine

Natural Treatments for High Blood Pressure

http://www.altmedicine.about.com/cs/herbsvitaminsek/a/Hypertension.htm

{Not a product endosement)

RESPeRATE

FDA approved to lower blood pressure without drugs

Patient information

http://www.resperate.com/usb/welcome/index.aspx


Recently in the Media

Tested For The First Time At USC, Implant Could Lower Blood Pressure Without Drugs

http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/New-Implant-May-Lower-High-Blood-Pressure-Without-Drugs-217031831.html


CardioStar*



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KNOW your prescription drugs and KNOW them WELL!


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Drugs A-Z

http://www.webmd.com/drugs/index-drugs.aspx

Ask A Patient

Rate a drug, side effects, comments, etc.

http://askapatient.com/rateyourmedicine.htm
 
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Chrishen92 replied to cardiostarusa1's response:
That is a very helpful way to look at the drug issues. You are right. Also the genetic component I am sure hadnt been checked. I will share this information with her when we discuss it again.
 
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cardiostarusa1 replied to Chrishen92's response:
My father (who was a coronary artery disease and peripheral artery disease patient for about 10 years, had quad bypass, then multiple angioplasties, then stents) was hyper-sensitive or intolerant to most cardiovascular prescription drugs, and the horrendous mind-altering side effects he experienced had damn near killed him, several times.

CardioStar*



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