Skip to content
ECG - suspect anterior myocardial infarction
avatar
suri2509 posted:
Hi,

i am 33 male 5'7" and 70Kg weight. Yesterday as a toutine health check up i tool an ECG which gives me abnormal results.

1. suspect anterior myocardial infarction
2. suspect posterior myocardial infarction
3. Slight ST- T abnormality.
4. Tachicardia - 116 BPM

No chest pain but i always had palpitations (90-100) and when i took above ecg my heart beat was 116BPM.

I was diagnose with panic attack before a year and iam using cymbalta (duloxitine) for same. Before 3 months i had a ecg and holter monitor which shows OK. I didnt met a cardiologist with my recent ECG report. Please let me know about this problem

Additional Info - BP 140/60 - 180/100
All other blood tests are OK except Cholestrol test
Lipid Profile - 240 LDL, 60HDL
always feel dizzy since 2 years (for this i have had MRI brain , spine. Spinal MRI says mild disc dehydration seen at c2-c7)


.
Reply
 
avatar
cardiostarusa1 responded:
Hi:

"I didn't meet a cardiologist with my recent ECG report."

Consulting with one seems warranted.

In general-only here, a routine resting electrocardiogram (ECG) is an "inexact science", a relatively low-sensitivity 2D recording of a dynamic 3D process, offering limited heart-diagnostics, and sometimes yields inconclusive or erroneous results.

HeartSite

EKG

It is important to remember that EKGs are not 100% accurate. Normal recordings can be obtained in patients with significant heart disease , or some "abnormalities" may exist in the presence of a normal heart.

http://www.heartsite.com/html/ekg.html

The most common type of palpitations, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs, occurs even in many healthy individuals), has various causes or triggers, cardiac and non-cardiac.

Often, PVCs are typically harmless, be it isolated (single), couplets (2-in-row), triplets (3-in-a-row) or salvos (short bursts of 3 or more in-a-row), bigeminy (occurring every other beat), trigeminy (occurring every third beat), quadrigeminy (occurring every fourth beat), etc., etc.

However, the main problem or concern (even more so, much more emphasized for those with certain major or serious heart conditions) with PVCs is if/when sustained ventricular tachycardia (runs of PVCs over 30 seconds) occurs.

Symptoms that may/can occur wih PVCs includes none at all or chest pain/discomfort/pressure/tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness/dizziness, and in uncommon to rare cases, near-syncope or syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, includes fainting and passing out).

Normal resting range heart rate in adults is 60-100 BPM. Average in men is 72-78 BPM. Normal resting blood pressure in adults is under 120/80 with 115/75 or 110/70 considered as being optimal/ideal.

Prehypertension is defined as systolic of 120-139 mmHg and diastolic of 80-89 mmHg. Stage 1 is systolic of 140-159 and diastolic of 90-99. Stage II is systolic of 160-179 and diastolic of 100-109. Stage III is systolic greater than 180 and diastolic greater than 110. Stage IV systolic of 210 and greater, and diastolic of 120 and greater.

Health dangers from blood pressure vary among different age groups and depending on whether systolic or diastolic pressure (or both) is elevated, and for how long.

Elevated blood pressure, isolated diastolic hypertension, isolated systolic hypertension and diastolic/systolic hypertension, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and renovascular disease.

High systolic blood pressure appears as a significant indicator for heart complications, including death, in all ages, but especially in middle-aged and older adults.

High diastolic pressure is a strong predictor of heart attack and brain attack in young adults and in those of any age with essential hypertension, high blood pressure from unknown causes, which occurs in the great majority of cases.

Also, pulse pressure is important, the difference between systolic and diastolic. Usually, the resting (in sitting position) pulse pressure in healthy individuals is 40 mmHg, give or take a bit. A consistently narrow (say 20-25 or less) or consistently wide (say 60-65 or more) pulse pressure is not good.

Best of luck down the road of life.

Take care,

CardioStar*

WebMD member (since 8/99)

-

-

WebMD

Heart Disease TYPES

Men/Women

Acquired/congenital

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/heart-disease-men


-

LEARN ABOUT the Heart


WebMD

The Heart: (Human Anatomy) Pictures, Definition, Location in the Body and Heart Problems

http://www.webmd.com/heart/picture-of-the-heart

-

Quote!

"Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

- Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

.

It's your future......be there.

. .

WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.


Featuring Experts

James Beckerman, MD, FACC, is a cardiologist at the Providence St. Vincent Heart Clinic in Portland, OR. He graduated summa cum laude from Harvard Col...More

Helpful Tips

Nix Grapefruit & Statin DrugsExpert
Grapefruit & statin drugs can be a bad combination. Unlike other citrus fruits, grapefruit contains substances that disable certain ... More
Was this Helpful?
13 of 15 found this helpful

Expert Blog

The Heart Beat - James Beckerman, MD, FACC

Dr. James Beckerman shares how small, livable lifestyle changes can have a real impact on your risk of heart attack and stroke...Read More

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information, visit the Duke Health General and Consultative Heart Care Center