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    inoperable heart to high risk.
    avatar
    heyhay posted:
    My 63 year old dad had a heart attack 3 years ago while driving big rig he thought it was just indigestion and did not seek medical attention till 4 days after and sure enough they informed him he indeed had a heart attack and he was lucky to be alive. They proceeded and put 3 stents in but the 4th was unsuccessful due to to much damage to the left side of the heart. A year and 2 months ago he had a blood clot on his brain and had to go for brain surgery to have it removed they got it out and all was okay. Recently he has been having shortness of breath and he went for another stress test and heart exams and such and they wanted to send him for a bypass(CABG) but because of the brain bleed a year ago they are saying it is to high risk and will not operate. Should we seek a second opinion? Does this sound right is it honestly inoperable? I am pretty worried that his is just gonna give up hope and get depressed. And the stress of it all is not going to help. Just wondering if there are any other ways they can operate or fix this problem? any input would be appreciated.

    Thank You!!
    Reply
     
    avatar
    cardiostarusa1 responded:
    Hi:

    ......"and they wanted to send him for a bypass (CABG) but because of the brain bleed a year ago they are saying it is to high risk and will not operate."

    "Should we seek a second opinion?"

    Sure.

    The hospital/medical center you choose can make a difference...a critical difference. Choose wisely!

    Credentials, Experience, Research

    U.S. News & World Report

    Best Hospitals: Heart & Heart Surgery

    http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings/heart-and-heart-surgery


    In general,-only here heart surgery, or non-surgical catheter-based procedures carries risks (and the possibility of complications, some unforeseen).

    Outcomes can not be predicted though, and pre-existing medical conditions (cardiac or otherwise), negative factors, and especially comorbidities (medical conditions known to increase the risk of death in addition to the most significant condition that causes an individual's stay in the hospital), as well one's general overall health are taken into consideration.

    Beyond drug-therapy, if/when common procedures, first time or re-do, such as angioplasty, with or without stents, or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgey are not deemed feasible, as applicable to the patient, there may/can be other options, that includes non-invasive EECP, laser-based TMR and gene therapy/transfer.

    FDA approved non-invasive Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP) treatments.

    Are You a Candidate for EECP Therapy?

    http://www.eecp.com

    Surgical-based transmyocardial revascularization (TMR, FDA approved).

    Holmium:YAG laser

    http://www.cardiogenesis.com

    Growing your own so-called "bio-bypass" (collateral vessels) around blockages in the heart, and in the legs
    It's known as gene therapy/gene transfer, which has been in experimental phases for quite some time now.
    .
    As reported, over the last 20 years, gene therapy has moved from pre-clinical animal investigations (animal models) to human clinical studies for many diseases ranging from single gene disorders, to much more complex, multi-factorial, multi-conditional diseases such as dreaded cancer and cardiovascular disorders.

    Readers Digest Online - February 2008

    An experimental treatment is giving desperately ill heart patients a new lease on life.

    A process called angiogenesis. The experimental procedure had shown great promise in two German studies, and the FDA had approved the launch of the first American clinical trial.

    The technique involves injecting the heart with a protein called fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1).

    "The protein is like a seed that causes new vessels to sprout, creating a network of capillaries and small arteries."
    FGF-1 occurs naturally in the body.

    http://www.readersdigest.com.au/heart-hope

    Best of luck to your dad.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



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    CAD is a chronic disease with no cure. When you have coronary artery disease, it is important to take care of your......

    This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or......

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    See your doctor for regular check-ups......


    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease


    -

    Good to know, for the primary and secondary prevention of heart attack/brain attack

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed risk factors (encompasses some new, novel or emerging) for atherosclerosis, typically affects carotid, coronary, peripheral arteries, which includes age, gender, genetics, diabetes, smoking (includes second/thirdhand), inactivity, obesity, high blood pressure (hypertension), Low HDL (now questionable, according to recent studies) high LDL, small, dense LDL, RLP (remnant lipoprotein), high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, HDL2b, high homocysteine (now questionable), and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP).

    -


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