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    New CAD Diagnosis
    avatar
    heathers82 posted:
    Three weeks ago my husband was diagnosed with advanced coronary artery disease just a few months shy of his 40th birthday. I, his wife, am 31. The cardiologist was hopeful that he may only need one stent as his perfusion study only showed mild abnormality at the very end of the stress portion. She also stated he was "a very healthy looking man". When she came out to speak to me after his catheterization, she was visibly upset. He has five areas of 80-90% blockage in all of the arteries stemming from the right main coronary artery. One vessel actually had formed its own collateral circulation on the posterior wall of the heart. The only thing saving him from bypass was that his left main and left anterior descending arteries are open with "negligible" amounts of plaque. She stated that his arteries were small and fragile for a man of his size (6'1" and 315lbs) and could not be safely stented at that time. He has had little to no symptoms leading up to this, only a mild nagging ache in his left chest which the cardiologist is attributing to GERD. She said he has felt none of the blood flow restriction. Now that he has been on omeprazole for almost three weeks, he doesn't have the pain. He was also started on Imdur which could be helping as well. She told us he could have a very good chance at long term survival if we gave up all animal products and oils NOW. She feels he is depositing all of the cholesterol he eats. His total cholesterol is about 187. So, for three weeks now we have been on a low sodium, little to no oil, vegan diet. He has lost over 20 pounds and I have lost 17. Our blood pressures and blood sugars are also plummeting (in a good way). I am an RN that once did cardiac nursing and am therefore TERRIFIED. I'm glad that I have stopped waking up in the middle of the night to check on him, but it has been a very emotional time. I have been more open with my emotions than he. I will do whatever I can to find this terrible disease so my husband and I can live a full life together. His daughter is 11, so we have a lot to live for. So, I suppose my question is, are there any other "young" folks out there in a similar situation or have switched to a plant based diet? Feedback would be greatly appreciated.
    Reply
     
    avatar
    billh99 responded:
    You might ask in the Heart Health Fuhrman Ornish forum.

    I don't know their age, but they are a group with heart disease that are on a plant based diet.

    http://exchanges.webmd.com/heart-health-fuhrman-ornish


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