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widow maker
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raddad18 posted:
I just had a double bypass about 5 weeks ago, at canton aultman hospital. my doctor told me that I had what they call the widow maker I am one lucky man. why am I so lucky ? my blood pressure was 233/198 he said I have no heart damage. I am wondering how long will it take me to get back to normal or will I ever get back to my normal life? my chest muscles hurt when I do stuff out around the house how long will this last ? thanks raddad
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CardiostarUSA1 responded:
Hi: Recovery post-bypass is a variable. b "Doctor told me that I had what they call the widow maker I am one lucky man. Why am I so lucky?" A narrowing of the proximal (closest to the point of origin) portion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery is known as the "Widowmaker" due to its prognostic implications. If/when a complete blockage (100% total occlusion) in this specific area in the LAD occurs, it is nicknamed "Widowmaker" because it is often lethal (fatal). The most truest form of the "Widowmaker" or "Widowermaker", and absolute worst case scenario, is a total (100%) occlusion in the left main (LM) coronary artery (feeds massive left ventricular area), which is extremely rare and almost always invariably fatal. Take care, CardioStar☆ WebMD community member (8/99) - - b ☑Be well-informed WebMD b Living With CAD A chronic disease with no cure. When you have CAD, it is important to... This is especially true if you have had an interventional procedure or surgery to improve blood flow to the heart..../It is up to you to take steps.... b Recognize the symptoms. Reduce your risk factors. Take your medications. See your doctor for regular check-ups... www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/living-with-heart-disease - b The LAD This MAJOR branch of the left main coronary artery has been called the "widow's artery" since it produces many widows each year. The LAD runs on the front of the heart in a groove that demarcates the left and right ventricles (lower pumping chambers) and provides blood supply, oxygen and nutrients to a large part of the interventricular septum, and the front wall (anterior) of the left ventricle. Obstruction of this artery causes damage to a large area of heart muscle in the left ventricle, and is often deadly. - b Coronary artery anatomy www.heartsite.com/html/lad.html - Society of Thoracic Surgeons b WHAT TO EXPECT AFTER YOUR HEART SURGERY Guide for patients ☞Each individual patient responds to surgery differently... www.sts.org/sections/patientinformation/adultcardiacsurgery/heartsurgery/?CFID=28496825&CFTOKEN=10820541 Cleveland Clinic b Heart Surgery Recovery my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/disorders/recovery_ohs.aspx b Cardiac Rehab Typically, cardiac rehab plays an important role in the overall recovery process, which is different for everyone, and at ANY AGE. WebMD/Healthwise b Cardiac Rehab www.webmd.com/heart-disease/tc/cardiac-rehabilitation-topic-overview Mayo Clinic b Cardiac rehab: Building a better life after heart disease www.mayoclinic.com/health/cardiac-rehabilitation/HB00017 b Mended Hearts Hope for recovery. Hope for a rich, full life. For more than 50 years, Mended Hearts has been offering the gift of hope and encouragement to heart patients, their families and caregivers. www.mendedhearts.org - b Good to know, for the primary/secondary prevention of heart attack/brain attack Epidemiologic studies have revealed risk factors for atherosclerosis (typically affects coronary, carotid, peripheral arteries), which includes age, gender, genetics (gene deletion, malfunction, mutation), diabetes, smoking (also secondhand), inactivity, hypertension, diet high in fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, high LDL, high Lp(a), high ApoB, high Lp-PLA2, high triglycerides, LOW HDL (less than 40 mg/dL, an HDL level of 60/65 mg/dL or more is considered protective against coronary artery disease), high homocysteine, and high C-reactive protein (CRP/hs-CRP). - i Quote "Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!" - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society . b It's your future....be there. :-)
 
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James_Beckerman_MD responded:
Congratulations on getting good care and taking charge of your health! Typically people have a month of limited activity (although daily walks are strongly recommended), and after your cardiologist and surgeon see you at a one month follow-up, you will likely be cleared to drive and to start doing more activities. Your chest muscles may take a while to regain strength and to heal appropriately - don't try to do too much too quickly. Good luck!!!


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