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    Pomegranate, beets, Hallawi dates, and quercetin foods for heart disease
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    DeadManWalking56 posted:
    http://www.theheart.org/article/253003.do

    http://www.saveonfoods.com/foodnutrition/top_100_foods/pomegranates.htm

    " The anthocyanins and tannins in pomegranates boost levels of paraoxonase, an enzyme that breaks down oxidized cholesterol, preventing the development of plaque on artery walls. Plus, this enzyme attacks the fatty steaks and plaque on artery walls, breaking them down and helping to regress athlerosclerosis."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20028357?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=1
    Betaine helps PON1, and Hallawi dates.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19681613?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=5
    And "Quercetin up-regulates paraoxonase 1 gene expression with concomitant protection against LDL oxidation."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19141295?itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum&ordinalpos=8
    Found in: "Foods rich in quercetin include capers (1800 mg/kg)[12>, lovage (1700 mg/kg), apples (44 mg/kg), tea (Camellia sinensis), onion, especially red onion (higher concentrations of quercetin occur in the outermost rings[13>), red grapes, citrus fruit, tomato, broccoli and other leafy green vegetables, and a number of berries including cherry, raspberry, bog whortleberry (158 mg/kg, fresh weight), lingonberry (cultivated 74 mg/kg, wild 146 mg/kg), cranberry (cultivated 83 mg/kg, wild 121 mg/kg), chokeberry (89 mg/kg), sweet rowan (85 mg/kg), rowanberry (63 mg/kg), sea buckthorn berry (62 mg/kg), crowberry (cultivated 53 mg/kg, wild 56 mg/kg),[14> and the fruit of the prickly pear cactus. A recent study found that organically grown tomatoes had 79% more quercetin than "conventionally gr own".[15>

    A study[16> by the University of Queensland, Australia, has also indicated the presence of quercetin in varieties of honey, including honey derived from eucalyptus and tea tree flowers.[17>"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercetin
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