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Oil, salmon, walnuts, carotenoids
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DoloresTeresa posted:
I was just reading about Vogel's Bart test. Olive oil constricted arteries by 31%, canola oil by 10% and salmon by only 2%. Walnuts INCREASED the flow by 24%. 'This was due to the omega threes. I don't know about other nuts and seeds.

It seems to me that for someone who hasn't had angina or heart surgery that a little salmon every now and then would be okay because it would provide omega threes, B12, vitamin D (wild caught sockeye has about 800 IU's per 4 ounces), calcium from the bones and perhaps iodine which you might not be getting if you are not eating salt.

Fuhrman recommends nuts and seeds but he is recommending those which might be without omega threes. I don't think other nuts showed that they increased blood flow in the arteries. Perhaps someone can find information about this. Esselstyn should be aware of this yet I believe he errs on the side of caution. The effect of walnuts on blood flow is in the literature.

Another study showed that carotenoids were absorbed in proportion to the amount of fat eaten with them. So walnuts in a salad could be the additional fat.

Yet another study I read showed the benefit of consuming red wine with green olive oil (not refined) which may be why Italians and Greeks had freedom from heart disease when still on their traditional diets. I do not recall that the BART tests were done with adding wine to the salads they served.

Dolores
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EngineerGuy responded:
Hi Dolores,

Great post, as always.

Dr. Fuhrman recommends a wide variety of nuts and seeds, and probably walnuts are mentioned most often. He does not recommend that someone pick only one nut or seed, and concentrate on that. I do include walnuts nearly every day.

Re: "Another study showed that carotenoids were absorbed in proportion to the amount of fat eaten with them. So walnuts in a salad could be the additional fat."

Absolutely. My wife and I usually have some nut, seed, or avocado on a salad, often walnuts. For those reading, "in proportion to the amount of fat eaten with them" was a small amount of fat. If I recall correctly, in one study such as Dolores is mentioning, zero, 3 and 6 grams of fat were the amounts of fat taken with the salad, with more carotenoids absorbed. 6 grams is about 1/5 of an ounce. Some people will take this information as confirmation that their globs of salad dressing, drowning some poor little drenched lettuce leaves with oil and salt, as a healthful move. Not so at all. The healthy fat addition to a salad, is some walnuts, or other nut or seed, or avocado, for example. For those happy and healthy and meeting their health goals, Dr. Fuhrman would allow 1 teaspoon of olive oil, as part of a healthy diet.

Re: "Yet another study I read showed the benefit of consuming red wine with green olive oil (not refined) which may be why Italians and Greeks had freedom from heart disease when still on their traditional diets."

The traditional Italians and Greeks were also quite scrawny, working agriculturally, etc. Also they ate lots of vegetables. If consuming wine with green olive oil is actually THE secret, then the Esselstyn study would have failed, as they quite specifically excluded all oils, and allows alcohol in moderation. Many studies appear to show a benefit to a food, by comparing to foods that we all agree are not good. Is olive oil best minimized/excluded? The authorities we follow would say so. Can you have a teaspoon? Why not?

Thanks, Dolores, for a great post, as always. I appreciate the opportunity to add my 2 cents to interesting ideas.

Best regards, EngineerGuy


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