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PBS: 3 steps to Incredible Health with Dr. Fuhrman
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EngineerGuy posted:
Hi folks,

PBS: 3 steps to Incredible Health with Dr. Fuhrman

Check you local listings for time. In Salt Lake, PBS KUED is showing it Sat Jan 4 2:30pm and Sun Jan 5 noon.

Here's a quick 30 sec clip

http://video.pbs.org/video/1919328066/

Best regards, EngineerGuy
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xring responded:
It will be aired several times. I'm watching it tonight at 11:30pm.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.
 
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xring replied to xring's response:
It was a GREAT presentation!

Dr. Fuhrman answered one question I've had since losing 70 lbs. on his "Eat to Live" program: How the weight just fell off & stayed off without me even thinking about it - after 40 years of unsuccessful previous dieting. The "Micronutrients" (abundant in Dr. Fuhrman's recommended foods) assist greatly with weight loss.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.
 
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DoloresTeresa replied to xring's response:
I was disappointed. He did not actually explain the program and the foods to any extent and it just seemed to me like an advertisement to send money to pbs or to buy his books.

He talks about nutrients and hunger in his book.

Dolores
 
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xring replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
Since I'm not much of a chef & I don't like spending time preparing food, after reading "Eat to Live" I simply designed my meals & snacks around his suggestions, rather than having an actual "meal plan."

The PBS program was probably designed for people who never heard of him or his books.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.
 
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EngineerGuy replied to xring's response:
Hi Xring,

Re: Dr. Fuhrman answered one question I've had since losing 70 lbs. on his "Eat to Live" program: How the weight just fell off & stayed off without me even thinking about it - after 40 years of unsuccessful previous dieting. The "Micronutrients" (abundant in Dr. Fuhrman's recommended foods) assist greatly with weight loss.


I've felt it too. I went traveling to see friends and family when my brother-in-law passed away. Except for the funeral part, everyone had an excellent visit. And, there was food everywhere. I tried to break the diet in moderation, but failed miserably. Rich food has an addictive nature. And, even though I ate far more calories than usual, in 2 or 3 hours, I was famished again. The type of food is very important.


Best regards, EngineerGuy
 
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EngineerGuy replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
Hi Dolores,

Re: I was disappointed. He did not actually explain the program and the foods to any extent and it just seemed to me like an advertisement to send money to pbs or to buy his books.


I understand what you mean. It was for the PBS pledge drive, to support PBS, which is a charitable effort.


Dr. Fuhrman mentioned that only PBS could allocate enough time, for Fuhrman to describe what he did describe. There's actually a bit more to it. The magazine Diabetes Today heard of Dr. Fuhrman, and were very excited, and asked Fuhrman to write an article for them. Dr. Fuhrman wrote an article describing 4 case histories of diabetics who got off insulin. He got the $750 author's fee. Then Diabetes Today called Dr. Fuhrman, and were very forthright. They said that their sponsor sold insulin, and could Dr. Fuhrman re-write the article, with the diabetics getting on a reduced dosage of insulin. Fuhrman said he couldn't do that, so he returned the $750, and the article was never published.


In another instance, 20/20 TV show heard of Dr. Fuhrman, and spent hours filming interviews with him, his patients, and office staff. The show was never aired, due to corporate sponsors of the TV networks, all the drug companies.


So, PBS is not supported by drug company ads. That is the real reason that only PBS could air Fuhrman's program.


Another point is that Fuhrman had about 60 minutes. In that time, you can only cover so much. Going into the diet more, might mean showcasing the results less. Which is better? Don't know.


Best regards, EngineerGuy
 
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EngineerGuy replied to EngineerGuy's response:
Hi folks,

Success !! PBS stations are repeating on prime time! One station has him on at 10PM, between Carole King and another well known... Hope it makes a tipping point.

Best regards, EngineerGuy
 
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xring replied to EngineerGuy's response:
I canceled my subscription to "Diabetes Today" after seeing their recommended diets - GUARANTEED to keep diabetics ON MEDICATION and also GUARANTEEING that their diabetes will progress so insulin will be required.

Like most diabetes magazines, there are ads everywhere for drugs & insulin.

Another gem from a Certified Diabetes Educator:
"Diabetics should limit their sugar consumption to no more than 8 spoons per day."
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.
 
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DoloresTeresa replied to xring's response:
X, I was at the health food store yesterday and in the check out line a man was asking for some product or other which is supposed to control your blood sugar. He told the clerk he and his wife were using cinnamon but she heard of this other supplement. They both had diabetes and his wife couldn't walk well enough to get out of the car and come into the store herself. He said she decided to go off her meds. I told him the only way their diabetes would improve was to go on a diet of vegetables, fruits, greens, beans, etc and to give up meat, dairy and fat. He said oh no he liked to eat meat and would never give it up.

It is easy to criticize the pharmaceutical industry and certainly doctors could do a better job of advising about nutrition, but the fact remains that most people simply will not make the sacrifice of giving up a diet they are used to even if they hear it will save their life. Look at all the information about diabetes on the net. If they have a computer, they have access to tons of information but choose to participate in diabetes boards and communities that reinforce their illogical and dangerous beliefs. Especially groups like web md diabetes community with a doctor who gives advice that maintains their poor health. After all, he is a doctor and he should know and if he doesn't say to give up meat, dairy and fat then why should they? Most educators and doctors give advice like Dansinger's. Why should they listen to a stranger in the health food store? I wouldn't either.

(I have to add that my brother was on the South Beach diet and saw no improvement in blood pressure, cholesterol etc, but after his eating mostly Fuhrman, the doctor reduced meds and then two weeks ago took him off all his meds)

Dolores
 
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xring replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
I agree that many people don't want to change their eating habits because it's difficult. However, my issue is with doctors who don't even mention that as an option. Such doctors are completely failing those individuals (however few) who are willing to make changes.

What doctors should do is present ALL information about diet & lifestyle (including medications and their risk), then allowing their patients to decide what they can or can't do.

When I was first diagnosed, my doctor wrote prescriptions, said "you need insulin" & disappeared.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.
 
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DoloresTeresa replied to xring's response:
Yes, you are right X. Twenty years ago my doctor handed me a prescription and a book published by one of the drug companies with diet information for diabetics. It was basically an exchange program using all the foods that helped create diabetics in the first place, but with more restrictions on calories. No mention whatsoever about monitors and testing my own sugars. When I asked if there was any way I could avoid complications she said no. It would only continue to get worse. I assume the medicine (sulfonylurea) was meant to delay somewhat the complications. She didn't even refer me to an endocrinologist (thank heavens) or send me to a diabetes educator (again thank heavens)

I realize I had the resources and ability to find out things for myself and that there are a lot of people who cannot do this.

Given that a doctor does have some knowledge
it would be hard to give proper advice and counsel given the time the HMO allows for each patient visit. Maybe the staff could be trained to do this freeing up the doctor's time.

Dolores
 
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xring replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
Yes, the HMO's time limit for each patient is definitely a factor. So are the hugh financial perks given to doctors by drug companies & also the control & funding of doctor's & CDE's education by drug companies.

It's unfortunate that if we want to be healthy, we not only must have the time to do our own research, we also have to be suspicious & untrusting of most doctors & CDE's.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.
 
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DoloresTeresa replied to xring's response:
X, re trust. Dr. McDougall says he does the best he can when prescribing something for his patients because he cannot really trust some of the studies he reads and has to make his best guess.

Dolores
 
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xring replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
Yes, it's a big mistake for any doctor to prescribe medication based on studies because they are funded by drug companies & their data has (of course) been adjusted in favor of medication.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison.


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