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Eradicated Hep C Still Dangerous?
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An_192554 posted:
If someone claims to have had "eradicated" Hep C for a number of years, is there a possibility, however remote, that that person could infect someone close to them such as a husband or wife? Is it true that this person could unexpectedly see a relapse in his or her condition, even after years of remission?
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oldtiff47 responded:
I HAVE BEEN CLEAR FOR 10 YEARS AND I STILL AND ALWAYS WILL TREAT MY BLOOD AS IF BAD...I TEACH MY GRANDS(6) THAT GRAMMY HAS SICK BLOOD AND NOT TO TOUCH IT IF I HURT MYSELF....IT IS A GOOD LIFE LESSON FOR THEM...

MY HUSBAND NOR DO OUR 3 ADULT DAUGHTERS DO NOT HAVE HCV....AND WE SHARED RAZORS TILL I FOUND OUT I HAVE HCV IN 93...

TIFF
DON'T TAKE YOUR ORGANS TO HEAVEN...HEAVEN KNOWS WE NEED THEM HERE !!
 
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Melissa Palmer, MD responded:
The chance of relapse - i.e. a return of the HCV virus, after 6 months of discontinuation of therapy and the HCVRNA is still undetectable ( < 5-10 IU/dL) is so rare that the medical community is now comfortable telling patients that they are cured. This means that you are not contagious to others by any means
It is important to remember two things.
1. HCVAb - hepatitis C antibody will remain positive - this does not mean that you are infectious to others, but it does mean that you will not be able to donate blood or organs in typical situations
2. If you have cirrhosis, you are still at risk for liver cancer and liver failure.

If you need further information, feel free to check out my website at www.liverdisease.com
 
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oldtiff47 replied to Melissa Palmer, MD's response:
IS IT NOT TRUE DR. P......THAT IF A HEPPER WHO HAS CLEARED AND DONATES AN ORGAN THAT THE RECIPIENT OF ORGAN CAN THE GET HCV FROM THE CLEARED DONOR ?....

I HAD HEARD THIS MANY YEARS AGO ON A LIVE MD CHAT...ON HCV...

TIFF
DON'T TAKE YOUR ORGANS TO HEAVEN...HEAVEN KNOWS WE NEED THEM HERE !!
 
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CplusAuto replied to Melissa Palmer, MD's response:
"The chance of relapse - i.e. a return of the HCV virus, after 6 months of discontinuation of therapy and the HCVRNA is still undetectable ( < 5-10 IU/dL) is so rare that the medical community is now comfortable telling patients that they are cured."

With all due respect, I keep reading posts from people in whom the virus has returned, which means that even though it was subdued to undetectable levels it was never really gone.

Can you please cite follow-up studies 1 year, 3 years, 5 years, 10 years post SVR including genotype and sub-genotype demonstrating that the patient is in fact cured and the virus has not returned?

Right now the medical community may be comfortable telling patients that they are cured but I would not in any way be comfortable accepting that. I would be forever waiting for the other shoe to drop.
 
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Susie2009 replied to CplusAuto's response:
Dr Palmer is absolutely correct. The chance of relapse after being clear for 6 months is about 1% and doctors believe that these people have not relapsed but actually re-infected. The antibodies for hepatitis C are unfortunately not protective. And no Tiff, that is not true about organ donors. That is old news and has proven totally untrue. Testing has also improved. The knowledge about these things has exponentially increased since the things you are talking about occured.
 
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oldtiff47 replied to Susie2009's response:
THANK YOU FRIEND...AS I STATED THAT WAS MANY YEARS AGO I HEARD THAT...


TIFF
DON'T TAKE YOUR ORGANS TO HEAVEN...HEAVEN KNOWS WE NEED THEM HERE !!
 
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CplusAuto replied to Susie2009's response:
"Dr Palmer is absolutely correct. The chance of relapse after being clear for 6 months is about 1% and doctors believe that these people have not relapsed but actually re-infected. "

Can you cite studies showing it's a different strain of the virus from risky behavior (drug use, for example) and not just bad behavior (drinking alcohol for example) which stresses the liver enough to let the dormant virus re-emerge?
 
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recordlibrarian replied to CplusAuto's response:
I am one of those. I was clear for 9 years, and, after finding the myeloma, they told me that my viral load was back.
 
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oldtiff47 replied to recordlibrarian's response:
MY YEARS ON THE BOARDS I HAVE SEEN THAT SOME WHO HAVE ANOTHER MEDICAL EVENT FIND THEIR HCV COMES BACK...BUT THAT WAS YEARS AGO...

I AM LIKE MOST WHO POST HERE A LAYMAN(WOMAN)....BUT IN MY BRAIN I KINDA UNDERSTAND IT....IMMUNE SYSTEM WORKING HARD MYELOMA....YOU HCV WOKE UP...

TIFF
DON'T TAKE YOUR ORGANS TO HEAVEN...HEAVEN KNOWS WE NEED THEM HERE !!
 
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Melissa Palmer, MD replied to recordlibrarian's response:
If you eradicated HCV successfully on medication with multiple accurate HCVRNA viral loads documented negative to at least less than 10 IU/mL, then either
1. The original diagnosis that you were cured after therapy was incorrect due to possilbly inaccurate blood testing or miscommunication - how many times and with what method was your viral load done that determined that you were cured, and after how many months of medication termination was the viral load tested?
2. This is a reinfection with a new strain of HCV- what is the genotype of the original strain of HCV and this strain of HCV?
3. If you have truly relapsed after so many years, your physicians need to report this in order to alert other physicians as to the specifics that we all need to be aware of.
If you like you can forward the name of your hepatologist to me and I could determine what is really going on
 
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CplusAuto replied to Melissa Palmer, MD's response:
Dr. Palmer, thank you for taking the steps to follow up on this.
 
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billm57 replied to CplusAuto's response:
relapse after 6months is possible in more than 1% of cases - theres research documenting this - some studies have shown as much as10% and some have shown 0% - the actual number is somewhere in between - the definition of svr states 98% -----the genotype most affected by this is type 1 - the subgroup of response is slow responder - the length of tx is 48 weeks - other determining factors are diabetes fatty liver disease and the use of immunosuppresive drugs - recommendation - slow responders should undergo 72 weeks of tx and maintain health and nutrition

- i did 48 weeks in 05 - 06 - type 1 - i had diabetes and fatty liver disease also - i was undetectable for almost 2 years - then the virus overpowered my compromised immune system i am not the only one as i know a few others personally- it does happen - however rarely - but it cant always be ruled as reinfection - there are no absolutes when it comes to hep c and its treatment
 
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oldtiff47 replied to billm57's response:
HI BILL MY FRIEND.....IT IS BILL FROM HOOD RIGHT ??? GREAT TO SEE YOU HERE YOU WILL ADD SO MUCH MY FRIEND....


TIFF
DON'T TAKE YOUR ORGANS TO HEAVEN...HEAVEN KNOWS WE NEED THEM HERE !!
 
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billm57 replied to oldtiff47's response:
yes tiff - one in the same - its been a little slow there lately and ive got some - lol - time on my hands - yes ive been visiting this site periodically and decided to join


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