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False positive for Hep Test?
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rohvannyn posted:
I tried to donate blood a while back and they refused me because they said I had a false positive for Hep (B I think). They said I didn't have the condition, however they can't take my blood.

I went back and did a re-test a year later and got the same false positive result. They once again assured me I didn't have Hep, but they still couldn't use my blood. Can anyone explain this or point me to a resource?

Why can they tell I don't have hep, but still not be able to use my blood because of the false positive? If they can tell I don't have it, what is the problem? I've always wondered and no one has had very good explanations, including medical professionals.
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Melissa Palmer, MD responded:
If you tested positive for Hepatitis B core Antibody ( HBcAb) without any other serologic markers for hepatitis B, this could mean that you were exposed to the virus at some point in your life, but do not have the disease, do not require treatment and cannot pass the virus to others. Alternatively this could represent a false positive test. but there is no definitive way of determining which situation occurred.
if the former is the case, while you may not have the disease or the consequences of the chronic hepatitis b, if someone who is immunocompromised ( such as during chemotherapy, or those with active HIV infection for example) receives blood from a person who has the HBcAb, there is a chance of viral activation in that person.
 
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rohvannyn replied to Melissa Palmer, MD's response:
Can anyone explain to me what a false positive actually is, though? I understand the exposure without contractin the disease, but I'm still not clear about what a false positive is.
 
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Melissa Palmer, MD replied to rohvannyn's response:
False positive means that the blood test indicates that you have or had hepatitis B but in reality you do not. Sometimes blood tests are incorrect due to a variety or reasons such as interacting circulating particles in your body that interact with the blood test. In general, if you are really false positive, you will show up with markers to hepatitis B lifelong, but you do not really have the disease.
 
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agriese replied to Melissa Palmer, MD's response:
I have had this same issue, and I've always wondered if this will go away? How come I've had the vaccine but these antibodies still show up in my blood?
 
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oldtiff47 replied to agriese's response:
THE DR. HAS NOT BEEN HERE FOR OVER A YEAR.

TIFF
DON'T TAKE YOUR ORGANS TO HEAVEN...HEAVEN KNOWS WE NEED THEM HERE !!
 
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fourstiks replied to Melissa Palmer, MD's response:
I was diagnosed with Hep C when I was fifteen years old, was kept on bedrest and good diet. For years after that my blood work showed exposure only. Now four years ago at age 49 it showed up as full blown Hep C. I figure I was so healthy my body was fighting the virus keeping the viral load down. If you show exposure you probably will test positive later in life.
 
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ghost9396 replied to fourstiks's response:
Wow how are u doing now? I was just diagnosed with hep c first of Dec. He said my levels are very low said i didn't need any meds . Ive only had 1 sex partner in June and it was only 1 time but she dosent have hep c. before that it has been 3 years.
Now i had a heart attack in Sep of 2008 so i go every 6 month for blood work. nothing has ever showed up. i have no insurance so i go to a family clinic. now all of a sudden i have harpies and hep c. he gave me a referral to go to a specialist but i don't have that kind of money. I'm SCARED and STRESSED out of my mind. your post relaxed me a little and gave me some hope. i have no one to talk to about it. Thank You. Ghost
 
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pgt1956 replied to ghost9396's response:
ghost9396,


Have you looked into Obamacare? Remember, now any previous conditions won't keep you from getting some kind of insurance. There are so many to choose: from Medicaid (if you're eligible), all the way up to Platinum plans. I've been on the WebMD community for awhile now, and find the people/help here to be great. Good luck, and know there are others "out here".


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