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Can a Needle prick cause HIV?
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An_248525 posted:
Okay, I was at a friends house last night and he was drinking, I wasn't but I was trying to look out for him in case he did something stupid, anyways, there was an uninvited guest at his house and he wanted the guest to leave, so he got a needle out of a bag he got from a local pharmacy and threatened to stick her with the needle, (it was just a joke I knew that but I sure as hell wasn't laughing). So he starts poking the guest with the needle, not so hard that it would stick into the guest but just poke. Then after the guest leaves. He starts fiddling around with the needle and wouldn't you know it, as I'm sitting beside him he decides to poke me with the needle to mess with me. It didn't exactly puncture me it just pricked me as they say. It started bleeding a tiny bit and I have a small red dot on my shin now. I ran home and put some alcohol on my shin but after that I was paranoid about me having HIV or anything of that matter, anyways I was just wondering if this could cause HIV because I'm still just a teenager.
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georgiagail responded:
The risk from a needle stick is NOT the stick itself but rather if the needle was attached to a syringe that contained liquid blood from an HIV positive individual...AND the contaminated blood was able to enter into the body of the uninfected person.

In other words, getting stuck with a clean needle is no more of a risk for HIV transmission than getting stuck with a safety pin.

I hope this makes sense...

Gail


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