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An_251316 posted:
Hello,

I am a 25 year old Englishman living in Shenzhen, China. Last Monday (01.04.13)
I visited a massage parlor and I had protected sex with a prostitute. I feel so anxious and worried that I have contracted HIV/AIDS. I can't think about anything else!
For reference, I only momentarily inserted my penis into her vagina, for 5 mins because I couldn't finish due to alcohol. Then she masterbated me for 10/15 mins.
Is it likely that I contracted the virus?
Since yesterday, I have experienced mild flu-like symptoms including a swollen throat, which is indicative of the virus. I tested negative to HIV before the experience. I hope I am still negative.
I am sooooo worried!!!!
Anyway, what would be the quickest and most effective way to find out?

Anonymous.
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georgiagail responded:
You indicate you had protected sex with this partner. I'm going to assume that a latex condom was used and it was used accurately and did not break or tear.

If so, there is no risk here. Even assuming she was HIV positive, the virus cannot cross an intact latex barrier.

Masturbation is not a risk factor for HIV transmission. Her hand cannot pass the virus onto you.

Whatever symptoms you are experiencing have nothing to do with HIV and probably a whole lot to do with lack of sleep and anxiety.

Gail
 
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jimmychina replied to georgiagail's response:
Thank you for your reply.

I really regret the experience.
Is it possible that if she or me touched her vagina and then masturbated me I could I get infected?

I'm not sure whether it was latex. I assume so. Supposedly, 1 in 200 prostitutes in China has HIV.

Should I still be worried?
 
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georgiagail replied to jimmychina's response:
"Is it possible that if she or me touched her vagina and then masturbated me I could I get infected?"

Masturbation on a male tends to focus on the shaft of the penis. The virus cannot pass through intact skin.

The first stages of HIV ("ARS") occurs 2 to 4 weeks after transmission. Your sexual encounter took place on April 1st with symptoms you now worry are associated with HIV on April 5th. Too early.

In a sense, it would be very helpful if "symptoms" didn't mimic those many have from stress and worry. For example, if noses turned green during the first stage of HIV THAT would be significant (and interesting!).

Not to make light of your concern but so many who have posted here develop what they are convinced are symptoms of early onset HIV (sore throats, headaches, body aches, GI symptoms, swollen lymph nodes) and are often shocked to find out with testing that they are actually HIV negative and that all these symptoms were due to lack of sleep, worry and (in the case of swollen lymph nodes) continually poking at them.

Focus on the fact that you used a condom and that it was a latex condom, was used accurately, did not break or tear and that masturbation does NOT transmit the virus and thus your risk of acquiring HIV from this event is.....zero. Nada. Nothing.

If you remain concerned, then get a screening test at the 90 day mark. It will undoubtedly be negative.

Gail
 
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An_251316 replied to georgiagail's response:
Thank you for the reassurance.

On final question: what would be best the way to confirm that I am HIV status? If I done an antibody test after one month,would that be reliable? Do you think it would be worth doing a PCR test or something similar?
 
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georgiagail replied to An_251316's response:
The antibody test at 3 months would be the recommended test. There is no need for the far more expensive PCR test for this non-exposure (although I suspect that is what you are likely to undertake since this test can be done much sooner).

Gail
 
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An_251316 replied to georgiagail's response:
Again, thank you for the response.

I'm just concerned about the masturbation part of my experience. If she masturbated me and touched her vagina beforehand, would it be possible for her to spread HIV to me in this way?

Also, I read from a few different sources that an Antibody test after 25 days is quite accurate. Is that true?

Thank you.
 
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georgiagail replied to An_251316's response:
" If she masturbated me and touched her vagina beforehand, would it be possible for her to spread HIV to me in this way?"

No.

Roughly 95 percent of newly infected folks will have enough antibodies present to be picked up by screening methods 25 days after transmission.

Gail
 
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jimmychina replied to georgiagail's response:
Ok,

thank you.

I will get tested at the end of the month.
 
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jimmychina replied to jimmychina's response:
What kind of screening test should I get at twenty five days?

A blood test? Or something else?
 
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georgiagail replied to jimmychina's response:
An antibody screening test. This can be done using either an oral (i.e., a scraping from your gum) or blood sample. I am not familiar which test might be available in China.

Gail
 
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jimmychina replied to georgiagail's response:
Hello,
Firstly, sorry to bother you again.
I will have a 4th generation (duo) test next Thursday at a clinic in Hong Kong. Supposedly, it can detect p24 antigen and antibodies. Next Thursday will be the 18th April, 16 days after possible exposure.

They claimed that it will be will have a 97% accuracy ratio at/after 14 days. However, I have read conflicting information about the accuracy of the test 14 days after exposure.

Will it be really accurate enough?
What do you think?
 
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georgiagail replied to jimmychina's response:
I'm going to give you my honest answer here.

I think you should wait and test at the 90 day mark if you get tested at all.

Why?

Because you haven't listened to anything I've told you when I've written there was no risk in your sexual event in the first place. That neither protected intercourse nor masturbation presents ANY risk in terms of HIV transmission (even assuming your partner was HIV positive).

Despite this, you persist in believing you need to be tested.

I suspect if you do get tested at the 14 day mark and get the test results (which will, undoubtedly be negative because the risk wasn't there in the first place), you will continue to worry that the test was done too early and thus the test results cannot be accurate.

So...if you believe you MUST get tested, save your $$$$ and get tested at 3 months.

Gail
 
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jimmychina replied to georgiagail's response:
Sorry for defying your judgement.

I think you are right. Am I really that irrational?

Thank you again for you input and sincerity.

James.
 
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georgiagail replied to jimmychina's response:
You're not defying my judgement because, well, who cares about my judgement.

But you really are over worrying this whole event. HIV is actually a pretty difficult STD to pass on to someone else. One of the most difficult ones to pick up from someone else. It can't cross through an intact latex barrier (no STD can) and it sure can't be passed from someone masturbating you. Both of these exercises are "non-exposures" in every sense of the world.

Sometimes when a person posts here about an event what they might be experiencing is more in the line of guilt. Perhaps guilt that they spent time with a sex worker or guilt that they got drunk and did something they'd normally never do or perhaps guilt because they stepped out of a relationship and they never thought they'd find themselves facing dealing with that memory.

It helps to focus on the fact that HIV is, after all, just a disease; a disease that has a VERY specific requirement in how it can be passed from one person to another and if those requirements aren't met, transmission just isn't going to happen.

Gail


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