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how long the HIV will take to reduce the amount of CD4+ cells?
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An_252424 posted:
I've been accidentally forgot to wash my hands (after took off my gloves) after working with blood samples that might be infected with HIV and then I ate. I'm worried that i might get an HIV infection. When can I have a CD4+ cell test since the infection of HIV to determine whether I got infected?
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georgiagail responded:
Before you consider testing, keep in mind that this is not how folks become infected with HIV in the first place. One could...literally...swallow blood containing the virus and unless they have an open (i.e., bleeding) wound in their mouth, esophagus,and/or stomach, the virus would not be enter their system but instead would be destroyed by the extremely acidic medium in the stomach.

This is the reason that oral sex carries such an extremely small risk of HIV transmission despite being a rather popular sexual exercise.

If you remain concerned, a screening test (i.e., an ELISA) can be done at the 90 day mark.

Gail
 
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octaviany replied to georgiagail's response:
Dear Gail,

Thank you so much for the attention and the time you've given to answer my question.. They are very very helpful and had put my mind at ease

Best regards,
Octaviany
 
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octaviany replied to georgiagail's response:
Dear Gail,

Thank You so much for the attention and the time you've given to answer my question.. they are very very helpful and had put my mind at ease

Best regards,
Octaviany


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